Access 2007 converts all my projects to .mde when I save to local drive

audreymjhha
audreymjhha used Ask the Experts™
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Hi,
   When I save my project to the c drive, access 2007 converts the project to .mde format. I did try converting a project to .mde but now it is converting all my.mdb files into .mde. How do I undo this?

Thank you
Audrey
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I would review the Access User-Level Security settings to ensure that that's not a policy set there overriding your attempts.  Check with your DBA or IT department for further information on the current configuration settings
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
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Commented:
 I've never heard of A2007 doing that and in checking the options, can't find anything that would control that.  Are you sure that is the case?
JimD.
 

Author

Commented:
Hi,
  Thank you for responding. When I create the .mde for a user, how do I set of the program to only display the form and not the tables?

thank you
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No, I'm not sure it's the case but I do know that there are User-Level security permissions that can be set that will automatically save the file in the most secure format based on paramiters either default are set on purpose.

As I'm sure you're aware, .MDE is the more secure: "When you convert an .mdb file to an MDE file, Access compiles all modules, removes all editable source code, and compacts the destination database. The original .mdb file isn't touched. The VBA code in the new database will continue to run, but it cannot be viewed or edited. Your Access database will continue to function normally and you can still update data and run reports. Specifically, saving your Access database as an MDE file prevents the following actions:

Viewing, modifying, or creating forms, reports, or modules in Design view.
Adding, deleting, or changing references to object libraries or databases.
Changing code using the properties or methods of the Access or VBA object models—an MDE file contains no editable code.
Importing or exporting forms, reports, or modules. However, tables, queries, data access pages, and macros can be imported from or exported to non-MDE databases."

Author

Commented:
Hi,
   When I create the .mde, the initial form loads but the buttons that normally open other forms dont open. What I was looking to achieve was to create an .exe type program where only the form window displays and the buttons execute their commands. Do you have any suggestions?

Thank you
Audrey
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
<<No, I'm not sure it's the case but I do know that there are User-Level security permissions that can be set that will automatically save the file in the most secure format based on paramiters either default are set on purpose.>>
  Use level security doesn't have anything to do with creating a MDE.  ULS can exist with both MDB's and MDE's and there is nothing in ULS that will cause a database to be saved as a MDE.  
  And with A2007, if your saving in the new ACE format, ULS is stripped out regardless of format as it's no longer supported.
JimD.

Author

Commented:
I am the administrator of my computer. When I open my .mdb project, I click on the button in access 2007 that says make .mde. If I click on the .mde, it opens access. I told the project to display a form on startup however the buttons dont respond the my clicks. Any suggestions?
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
<<When I create the .mde, the initial form loads but the buttons that normally open other forms dont open. What I was looking to achieve was to create an .exe type program where only the form window displays and the buttons execute their commands. Do you have any suggestions?>>
  A MDE has all the source code stripped out, so you can't place the database in most of the design modes.  Also are your users using a full retail version of Access or the runtime?  If the latter, there are a lot of restrictions, regardless of the format.
  To achive what you want, you should be distributing as a MDE, specifiying a startup form, setting the option to hide the database container, disabling of special keys, and disabling the default ribbion and toolbars and using your own ribbions and/or toolbars.
  Most of that is controlled through the Options dialog, Current database.
JimD.
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
You also need to set the AllowShiftKeyBypass property to false.  
JimD.

Author

Commented:
Thank you Jim,
   I was planning on distributing this application to someone that does not own Access.  I believe I have to download a program from microsoft.  Just to clarify, I should set up the options to hide the features while I'm in the .mdb mode. Why are all the buttons disabled after I convert to .mde. What is the point to .mde if I cannot execute the code?
Audrey
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
<< I was planning on distributing this application to someone that does not own Access.>>
You will need to download the runtime then. With the runtime, all design features are disabled. So even if you gave them a MDB format, they still could not do anything with it. however if they bought a full retail copy of Access after that, they could then change the DB. This is why you want to distribute in MDE format.
<<Just to clarify, I should set up the options to hide the features while I'm in the .mdb mode. >>
MDB or MDE. A MDE just means that you can't change code or objects with code (i.e. a form).
<<Why are all the buttons disabled after I convert to .mde. What is the point to .mde if I cannot execute the code?>>
Code is executable in a MDE. But you can't open a module or form and do so. Everything must be done under the apps control. You the user can't execute anything on your own, unless it's through a button or some other action.
What buttons are disabled that you are trying to use?
JimD.

Author

Commented:
All the buttons that have coding behind them are disabled.
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
<<All the buttons that have coding behind them are disabled.>>
  Yes, that would be correct as in the MDE, all the source code has been stripped out.  Only the object code remains.  
  To make this a bit clearer, you would work with your app when developing as a MDB and only when you go to distribute it in its final form would you make it into a MDE.
JimD.

Author

Commented:
Jim,
  I'm sorry I'm so confused. I downloaded the access 2007 developer extension and runtime from the microsoft website. I dont see how to create a "accdc" format. My access project is ready to be distributed. I still dont understand why the code is disabled. What is the point to creating a .mde that cannot perform any functions. Help, I'm so confused.
Thank you
Audrey
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
Audrey,
<<I'm sorry I'm so confused.>>
  Not a problem.
 <<I still dont understand why the code is disabled. What is the point to creating a .mde that cannot perform any functions. Help, I'm so confused.>>
  It's not that it can't execute code, it's that you can't change the code (or any objects that depend on code)
  Normally when you develop an application with Access, you provide a menu, forms, reports, toolbars, etc that let's a user carry out actions within the application via buttons or menus.
  When they do that, they are simply executing code and they can do that with a MDE.  A MDE has the source code stripped out, but not the object code.  So code you've written to do things can still run; it just cannot be changed.
  So when you develop your app, you do so with the MDB format and you do it with the full version of Access, which allows you to make design changes in everything (tables, forms, reports, code, etc).
  Now comes time to distribute.  You could simply hand the user a copy of the MDB and if they have the full version of Access already, they can run it and also change anything in it.
  But if you don't want them to be able to change it or see what you've done in code, then you make a MDE and give them that.  Now, even if they have the full version of Access, there's nothing to look at code wise.  But they still can make changes in things like tables for example (which does not depend on any code).
  Besides giving them the DB, you could also give them a runtime copy of Access.  The runtime is the same as the full version except that *all* design features are disabled no matter what format the DB is in.
 For example, with the runtime I cannot open a table in design mode, but I could with the full version with either a MDB or MDE format (because with a table, there is no code involved).
 Does that help?
JimD.

Author

Commented:
I am so sorry. I clicked on the button to make an .mde. I then doubled clicked on the .mde. It opened but I could not press on the buttons. I am on the same exact machine. I can then open the .mdb and it is ok. Do I need to compile?
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
<<I can then open the .mdb and it is ok. Do I need to compile>>
  You want to work with the MDB.  Forget about the MDE for the moment.  And yes, you should make it a habit to compile often.  If your app doesn't compile:
A. It indicates something is wrong.
B. It will perform poorly if left un-compiled.
JimD.
 

Author

Commented:
My program runs perfectly as an .mdb.  So, what should I do next?
President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Commented:
<<My program runs perfectly as an .mdb.  So, what should I do next?>>
  You are ready to distribute?    If yes, then:
1. Compile
2. Convert to a .MDE
3. Give user a copy of the .MDE
4. Give them a copy of the runtime if they don't have Access.
JimD.

Author

Commented:
my .mde button is gone and a .accde button is in its place. If the user has the runtime.exe installed on their computer, will they automatically be able to click on the .mde icon?

Author

Commented:
Sorry, I know I drove you crazy.
Jim Dettman (EE MVE)President / Owner
Most Valuable Expert 2017
Most Valuable Expert 2012

Commented:
<<my .mde button is gone and a .accde button is in its place. If the user has the runtime.exe installed on their computer, will they automatically be able to click on the .mde icon?>>
  Yes.  If they have installed the runtime and they double click on any Access database (not just MDE's), Access will open and the database will start.
  And BTW,  a MDE and accde are the same thing.  Starting with Access 2007, JET (the database engine used by Access) is now being called ACE.  Along with that, they changed the extentions you normally find (.MDB is now .ACCDB, .MDE .ACCDE).
JimD.

Author

Commented:
Thank you again!

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