Setting Up Exchange 2003

kymd26
kymd26 used Ask the Experts™
on
I am looking at setting up exchange 2003 on a network which has the following specs.

- 2 x Servers (1 2003 SBS Server, 1 x 2003 Server Standard)
- the standard server is being used as a terminal server (with remote access to around 20 users)
- the 2003SBS server has exchange installed but is only using it as a mailbox store and to route internal mail. They are currenly using POP3 mailboxeses for external mail.
- The Terminal server has a static IP (for remote access) but the SBS/exchange server does not

I would like to know the best way to set it up so that they are using exchange for all email (e.g. getting rid of the pop3 mailboxes). The main issue i am not sure about is the static IP. Do i need to get another static IP from the ISP and point it to the exchange server (then set the MX records of the mail.domain.com.au to the new static IP) or is there someway to reroute particular traffic to the SBS server using the current static IP for the terminal server.

any help would be appreciated

Regards

Kurt
Comment
Watch Question

Do more with

Expert Office
EXPERT OFFICE® is a registered trademark of EXPERTS EXCHANGE®

Commented:
NOt THE MX record can still point to the public address (provided by your ISP)
Simply creat a new network adress translation (NAT) on your firewall form the public IP to the internal IP  address of the mail server and open up the firewall to port 25 to that public ip in the acess list.
 
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
I assume you are going to use Exchange on the existing SBS? If not you need to spend quite a bit of money on licenses and there is very little if any advantage.

To configure Exchange on the SBS, do nothing. It is working now. Just remove the accounts from the POP connector, if using it on Exchange itself. If you did not create a self signed certificate by running the CEICW (server management | internet and e-mail | connect to the Internet) re-run the wizard. In the certificate box use the name with which you will connect to the server from off site such as  SBSname.doaminname.abc

You can use the same public IP, just create an External DNS Host record for SBSname.doaminname.abc which points to the public IP of the SBS site, and create an MX record that points to SBSname.doaminname.abc

Finally forward port 25 from your router to the SBS.
Commented:

No  the MX record can still point to the public address (provided by your ISP) .
If you only have one available IP address you can perfrom port address translation (PAT)
  • One Internet address but different ports for different services (i.e. SMTP port 25, http port 80, https 443, etc)
or
  • create a new network adress translation (NAT) on your firewall from the public IP to the internal IP  address of the mail server

  • open up the firewall to port 25 to that public ip in the access list.

Commented:
The SBS remote web workplace will allow users to access the terminal server behind the firewall.
Route the public IP to the SBS server - open ports 25, 443, 4125 and 444 if you want public access to the companyweb site. Set your MX record to the public IP. Make sure your ISP is not blocking 25, quite a few do.

I would also recommend a mail filtering solution - GFI Max, Postini or MXLogic. You point your MX to them and they filter mail for SPAM and virus. If you mail server or connection is down, thy will hold. Otherwise, senders will get a NDR.

Do more with

Expert Office
Submit tech questions to Ask the Experts™ at any time to receive solutions, advice, and new ideas from leading industry professionals.

Start 7-Day Free Trial