How many users can  "b", "g" and "n" access point handle realistically speaking, with the consideration that 80% users are doing bandwidth intensive tasks like watching video, downloading files etc.

patriots
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How many users can  "b", "g" and "n" access point handle realistically speaking without users being thrown off that access point, with the consideration that 80% users are doing bandwidth intensive tasks like watching video, downloading files etc.

Also what is their realistic range taking into consideration that they are placed in dorm rooms, hall ways etc.

What software's are out there that can be used to create a map showing how much area is covered by these access points over a particular location?
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Commented:
Wi-Fi bandwidth fells hardly when more than 1 person share it and on increasing distance from antenna,
but actual bandwidth is very variable, much more than cable links networks like ethernet.
For intensive tasks you need 1Mbps
I have a "g" 54Mbps and I stay almost over 10 Mbps at a distance of 2 flats from wifi router antenna (6m with 2 walls to cross).
With 3 laptop linked we fall to 1 Mbps, but in same room (3m distance and 1 wall to cross) we stay all over 10Mpbs.
"b" starts from 11 Mbps, with similar dynamics
"n" increases bandwidth, coverage area and number of antennas/connections, depending by implementation.
1) For just browsing on 11g, 10-15 people can connect and surf typical web pages (not all streaming video at once). Real world throughput with strong signal is only about 26Mbps. But with the considerations specified, I agree with franfred - 3 or 4 users per AP. 11b's maximum real-world throughput is about 5Mbps, so that would handle 1 or 2 people... 11n might be able to handle 6-8 people instead (the highest speeds are available only with wide channels, which means less APs without causing interference between them).

2) Realistic range depends on construction. Typical wood stud and drywall will limit range to about 2 or 3 walls before the signal gets too weak to provide 1Mbps real throughput (the angle the signal is hitting the wall[s] makes a difference, too - the wall 'looks' thinnest when penetration occurs closest to perpendicular). Stone, concrete (poured or block) and brick walls might limit reception to the same room the AP is in.

3) Try inSSIDer from http://www.metageek.net/products/inssider
There's also Network Stumbler, but that has problems on some vista (ergo 7 also) machines.  They're both free.

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