Outlook keeps asking for password, but does not accept it

alec1836
alec1836 used Ask the Experts™
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Yesterday morning most of my windows users were repeatedly being asked for their passwords when opening Outlook. Despite using the correct password they still could not get in.

The only workaround I have found is to reset their domain passwords & reboot the PC, sometimes more than once. This is not happening to all users.

We are on Exchange 2003 SP2 on a 2003 SP2 server.

The clients are Outlook 2003 & 2007 on XP & Vista. When this happens they are also unable to log into OWA. However, I can log into their OWA from my PC (Windows 7).

I also have 2 Entourage 2008 users who are getting a Error - 18599

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Author

Commented:
I should state that this started after the server was rebooted. Since that time I have also had hundreds of event id 529 Unknown user or name or bad password in the security log. Not sure if it's related.

Author

Commented:
I wonder if this could be a Kerberos issue?

I did apply some MS updates to the server the other morning, but didn't keep a record of which ones :-(

Author

Commented:
I've identified the updates & will try removing them.
Event 589 is logged when there is authentication failure...

Is the Exchange also installed on a DC/GC?
Has anything changed on the DC/GC?

Run NETDIAG and DCDIAG and check for any failures...
Commented:
It was a kerberos issue. I changed the Outlook clients to use NTLM for authentication which worked & confirmed that there was a kerberos problem. The Entourage clients were still erroring though.

One of my other DCs was complaining that there was a duplicate name on the network. There wasn't, and all the fixes I could find looked pretty complex, so I rebooted the server & that sorted it!

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