Unable to add an additional drive to dell server running Windows 2000

kwh3856
kwh3856 used Ask the Experts™
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Recently we added an additional drive to our server.  It has been registered in the Dell Array manager and shows as 245 Gig of Unallocated space.  When I go to drive manager there is no space to be allocated from this drive.  Can someone tell me what I am missing here are a few screen shots of the servers config.

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kwh3856Owner

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Commented:
Here is the screen shot
Screen-Shot-1.bmp
kwh3856Owner

Author

Commented:
Here is the second screen shot
Screen-Shot-2.bmp
kwh3856Owner

Author

Commented:
Third Screen Shot
Screen-Shot-3.bmp
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Commented:
I am not a really an expert in DELL's disk management system, but in general in such systems adding a physical HD doesn't mean it is usable once installed.
The installed physical HD needs to be mapped to a logical drive (virtual disk). Virtual disks are disks that may span one or more physical HD's depending on the RAID level being used.

In your case, I guess you need to create a new virtual disk of RAID level 0, spanning all the HD.
This virtual HD, will be seen later by windows as a newly installed disk. On that virtual disk, you can create new partitions and format them according to your needs.
ERP System Manager
Commented:
Probably need a couple more questions answered to give a fuller answer.  A virtual disk is spanned across multiple physical disks, and it looks like your Volume0 has been extended onto this new physical disk that has been added.

If you look at the capacitys on the 3 existing drives, it is ~34 GB.  The new disk, is ~280 GB BUT it does have ~34 allocated to a VirtualDisk by looking at that diagram.  ~280 - ~245 = ~34 GB.

It looks although it cant use more capacity from that drive than is available on the others.
PowerEdgeTechIT Consultant
Top Expert 2010
Commented:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but here is what I see and what that  means ...

You had a three-disk RAID 5 with three 36GB drives, giving you around 67GB of space for Windows to use.  You then added a 300GB drive and reconfigured it to a four-disk RAID 5, giving you around 100GB of space in Windows.  If this is correct, you cannot use the space that is unallocated to the array (245GB), so using a 300GB drive in this situation is a huge waste.  In order to use space that is unallocated to an array, you need to have unallocated space on ALL the disks, then you can create a new virtual disk using that space.

I would get a smaller drive to extend your array and set your 300GB drive up as a single-disk RAID 0.
Mark DamenERP System Manager

Commented:
I agree with the first half of your comment PowerEdge, same as I wrote above.

But the last line, a "single-disk" RAID 0?  That comment is very confusing for the author, as there is no such thing as a "single-disk" RAID.  RAID meaning redundant array of inexpensive disks.  An array need more than 1!
kwh3856Owner

Author

Commented:
Thank you very much for your assistance.  That was exactly the answer I was looking for.
PowerEdgeTechIT Consultant
Top Expert 2010

Commented:
Markus - Yes, RAID stands for Redundant Array of Inexpensive/Independent Disks, meaning that RAID 0 (no matter how many disks!) is not truly RAID, but has always been treated as a level of RAID regardless.  That said, Dell RAID controllers cannot set up a single disk for use without assigning it a RAID level.  The only RAID level that is appropriate for a single disk, is RAID 0.

KWH - glad I was able to help.
Mark DamenERP System Manager

Commented:
RAID 0 is striping data across multiple disks, therefore is an array. You are right that it is not redundant, and puts you at twice the risk should a single disk fail.

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