Networking for Hyper-V R2 cluster with CSV

quadrumane
quadrumane used Ask the Experts™
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I'm about to create for the first time a Windows 2008 R2 Hyper-V R2 failover cluster and then a Cluster Shared Volume.  

I've been readin on Technet and also the book "Mastering Microsoft Virtualization"  But there is something i'm not really sure about: networking.

So far here is what I've done

2x Network adapters have been assigned to iSCSI (10.10.10.0 255.255.0.0)  All targets have been added so the SAN is already seen by the hosts.

1x Network adapter for MANAGEMENT (10.0.1.1 255.255.0.0)

2x Network adapters assigned to the CLUSTER COMMUNICATION or HEARTBEAT (192.168.100.0 255.255.255.0)  

2x Network adapters assigned to CLIENT COMMUNICATION (on the same subnet than MANAGEMENT)

The failover validation test is passed.

1 - As far as I know I must add the networks MANAGEMENT, CLUSTER COMMUNICATION, CLIENT ACCESS AND iSCSI to the failover Cluster.  But how the Failover cluster is assigning it ?  There is no option to specify that de Heartbeat is the Hearbeat.  

2 - When time comes to enable CSV, do I need to assign another Network adapter to it ?  The author of the book "Mastering Microsoft Virtualization" says "the only cost to implement HA for Hyper-V is the cost of additional networking'  

Afterwards it jumps to the configuration and the only setps are to enable CSV, there is nothing about networking.  That told, this book is very helpful compared to Technet.

Thanks
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Commented:
1. Right click your network (not network adapter) in failover cluster management. You have one radio button and one checkbox for setting this.

2. No. CSV works on existings NIC but it increases the amount of data sent between nodes (i.e wneh node1 owns volume and node2 uses it via CSV). It costs networking performance actually :)
Technical Architect - HA/Compute/Storage
Commented:
The option to configure heartbeat will come _after_ the cluster is created.

Here is how I would configure your particular setup:

NIC 1 = Management
NIC 2 = Heartbeat (unless you are teaming?)
NICs for iSCSI = 2 as per your original
NICS for Hyper-V Guests = Balance

When you validate, the wizard may complain if you have more than 1 NIC on the same subnet.

Once the cluster has been created you can remove client access to the Heartbeat network in the Failover Clustering Management console for that network.

Make sure that the Virtual Network names that you are creating by binding to the node's NIC are the same across all nodes.

CSV is a simple right click and add storage. You add all of your HA disks and the wizard takes care of the rest. It is quite simple and there is no extra networking involved.

Philip

Author

Commented:
Thanks to both of you, it's really helpful.  

As you can see in this article down below  Microsoft recommends configuring a dedicated physical network adapter for only live migration traffic within the failover cluster manager MMC or using PowerShell.

What do you think ?

When you talk about removing the client access to the heartbeat are you talking about the HYper-V Guests NIC ?

Physical Network Adapters
Most Hyper-V servers have four or more physical network adapters or network interface cards (NICs) installed to handle Hyper-V management, Virtual Machine connectivity, IP Storage connectivity, Windows Failover Cluster or WFC Heartbeat communication, Live Migration communication, and Cluster Shared Volume or CSV communication. Smaller environments will require a minimum of 2-3 network adapters, while larger environments will require at least 4-5 network adapters. Let’s break down the reasoning behind the need for multiple physical network adapters.


•Hyper-V Management: Microsoft has always recommended that the Hyper-V parent partition (also known as management operating system or MOS) have a dedicated physical network adapter for management of the Hyper-V server as a best practice. For more information, see Configuring Virtual Networks on Microsoft TechNet.
•Virtual Machines: Might communicate over external, internal, and private virtual networks that are implemented through the Hyper-V parent partition. Each external virtual switch created must map to an individual physical network adapter or teamed network adapter. To provide redundancy in a production environment, you may choose to assign an external virtual switch to a network team or utilize multiple external virtual switches; both configurations will require a minimum of two NICs. For more information, see Configuring Virtual Networks on Microsoft TechNet.
•IP Storage: Microsoft has always recommended that IP storage communication be separated from virtual machine and cluster communications as a best practice, which NetApp supports. Therefore a minimum of one physical network adapter is required to support iSCSI communication from the Hyper-V parent partition. If you want to use multipathing or MPIO from the Hyper-V parent partition, a minimum of two or more physical network adapters are required. If enabling Windows failover clustering for Hyper-V, maintaining separation of IP storage traffic becomes a requirement for configuration before validating a failover cluster. For more information, see Hyper-V: Using Hyper-V and Failover Clustering and Hyper-V: Using Live Migration with Cluster Shared Volumes in Windows Server 2008 R2 on Microsoft TechNet.
•Windows Failover Cluster Private: If you create a Windows failover cluster for Hyper-V, it requires a cluster private network, and therefore often will require a dedicated physical network adapter. In previous versions of Windows Server, this was used primarily for the cluster heartbeat communications, but with R2 it will also be used for cluster shared volume communications (see “Cluster shared volumes” in this section). For more information, see Hyper-V: Using Hyper-V and Failover Clustering and Hyper-V: Using Live Migration with Cluster Shared Volumes in Windows Server 2008 R2 on Microsoft TechNet.
•Live Migration: This is a new feature for Windows Server 2008 R2; as such this does not apply to previous versions of Hyper-V before R2. When live migration of virtual machines is taking place, the communication for facilitating such traverses the network. As such, Microsoft recommends configuring a dedicated physical network adapter for only live migration traffic within the failover cluster manager MMC or using PowerShell. For more information, see Hyper-V Live Migration Overview and Architecture in the Microsoft Download Center and Hyper-V: Using Live Migration with Cluster Shared Volumes in Windows Server 2008 R2 on Microsoft TechNet.
•Cluster Shared Volumes: Cluster shared volumes are also a new feature for R2, so this section does not apply to previous versions of Hyper-V before R2. When cluster shared volumes are enabled within a Windows failover cluster for Hyper-V, there is communication between Hyper-V cluster nodes which are owners and nonowners of a particular CSV, which includes health checks and dynamic I/O redirection. A dedicated physical network adapter is recommended by Microsoft to ensure the necessary bandwidth to support these operations and minimize the event of a failover due to the inability to support CSV communication between nodes. For more information, see Hyper-V: Using Live Migration with Cluster Shared Volumes in Windows Server 2008 R2 on Microsoft TechNet.
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/Storage
Commented:
I suggest running the cluster creation wizard and bring the cluster up. Then you will see the setting in the Failover Clustering Manager when you right click on the various Cluster Networks and click on its Properties.

Philip

Author

Commented:
Ok I will bring the cluster up.

When you talk about removing the client access to the heartbeat are you talking about the HYper-V Guests NIC ?
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/Storage
Commented:
See attached as it shows the setting we disable for the heartbeat network.

Philip
10-02-01-Failover-Clustering-Man.PNG

Author

Commented:
So you Cluster Network 1 is the CLIENT ACCESS NETWORK which is the network used by the VMs ?

Maybe I'm confused... ?

Commented:
You should create virtual networks in your hyper-v management console and connect them to physical adapters.
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/Storage

Commented:
If you look at the screenshot, the "Allow clients to connect" setting is _unchecked_. This removes any access to that subnet by anything _but_ the cluster communication.

Philip

Author

Commented:
I'm aware of it.  Here is the thing I'm not really sure about:
Once the cluster has been created you can remove client access to the Heartbeat network in the Failover Clustering Management console for that network.
 
My understanding is that I should check the Allow clients to connect settings for all clusters networks (including iSCSI) but  virtual machines network (unchecked) so all networks are serving as heartbeat unless unchecked.  
Is that statement correct ?  So in my cluster networks I keep:
MANAGEMENT
CSV
iSCSI
CLUSTER
Only the Client network (Virtual machines) is no clustered.  
I think this time I'm on the track, well I hope so  :+)
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/Storage
Commented:
As I understand it, no.

Heartbeat will be on the designated network as per the above screenshot. Clients/VMs will not be using the iSCSI subnet because that is exclusively for communication with the SAN.

So, the only network that VMs/Clients need is the NIC set that you bind the Virtual Switch to with the host sharing for those NICs _disabled_.

Philip

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