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aman0711
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Digital SLR suggestions

Hi all,

       I am planning to buy a new Digital SLR and have no clue about it. Please drop in your suggestions. Which one to choose, Canon or Nikon? and why?
       My budget is between 500 - 900$. Also what type of lens would be just about perfect for a newbie like me?
Digital Cameras / CamcordersMiscellaneous

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aman0711

8/22/2022 - Mon
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lherrou

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aman0711

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Hi LHerrou,,
               
                    Thanks for quick reply. Actually I just have interest in photography and I want to start with an SLR. If you have to pick one Camera in my price range which would you go for? Canon or D5000?
     Also someone told me that Nikon cameras can only fit Nikon lenses (which are expensive), where as Canon can fit different vendor lenses.
     Also I want to buy something which I wont regret in near future in the way like this cam doesnt have that feature, this feature...
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lherrou

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aman0711

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Hey lherror,

               Thank you so much. This comparison is fantastic, I will read it and let you know which one I think would be the best for me. Could you please tell me what sort of lens (range) would be good for a newbie like me.
moorhouselondon

This is my favourite review site for cameras:-

http://www.steves-digicams.com/camera-reviews/

Over the years I've owned Canon and Nikon cameras.  Personally I find that the Canon menus are more intuitive than the Nikon ones, but maybe that's because I started with a Canon EOS SLR.  I now have a Canon 400D which I am very satisfied with.
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lherrou

There are some different ways to go with that. Since you're just getting started, sticking with a basic wide to moderate zoom (something like 17-55) is a good starting place. Then, once you establish yourself a little, and have a sense of what you like to shoot, you can expand to other lenses. In general, lens optical quality has gotten a lot better in recent years, although the build quality (cheap materials) can be poor in the cheaper lenses from any manufacturer (including Nikon or Canon).

The super-zooms (18-200, etc) tend to suffer from trying to do too much, although they are popular because they save the user from having to carry multiple lenses (although, why buy a dSLR if you aren't willing to change lenses?). Here's a comparison of three of them - remember that the Sigma and Tamron are available for both Nikon and Canon: http://www.radiantlite.com/2009/06/sigma-18-250mm-vs-tamron-18-270mm-vs.html

There's a nice Tamron Autofocus 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di - the f/2.8 means that it has a wide aperture (allows more light in) that stays one size throughout the zoom range - in cheaper lenses the aperture changes as the zoom changes. This is good in low light, but also allows greater creative control over the depth of field - here's a simple example of what that means in practice: http://www.digital-photography-tips.net/depth-of-field.html

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lherrou

>> get a book about your camera.

Moorehouselondon is right on the mark. And, after getting the book, the next thing to do is practice. So make a decision, get your dSLR, a decent lens, and start shooting. Set projects for yourself - "this weekend, I'm going to learn how to take pictures of flowers" and go out three or four times over the weekend, taking pictures of flowers, come back, look at what you took, think about what worked and why, read a bit more, go back out, and shoot more. Then, the next weekend, "I'm going to take the best portrait of my wife/gf/significant other that I can" and try different settings, different lighting, look at what works, change it up, read more, try more, etc.

The bottom line is that good photographers are better than their tools - it doesn't matter what you have (and almost any dSLR on the market these days will take a decent photo in most conditions), you have to learn to use it.
aman0711

ASKER
Hi moorhouselondon,

            Thanks for your suggestions. I am more interested in shooting landscapes.
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aman0711

ASKER
Hi lherrou,

               Thanks for the suggestion. after reading the review you gave me, I guess Canon one is better over D5000, right? How's D90 over Canon and D5000?

@ moorhouselondon,

 >>  Don't forget to buy a Skylight filter for the lens

  What exactly is this? and how much does it cost?
moorhouselondon

Brief description of its other purpose here:-

http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t258838-uv-protector-filter-vs-skylight-filter.html

Whether you buy a UV or a Skylight is up to you, but buy one or t'other.

http://www.jessops.com/online.store/products/23341/show.html

Thing you will need to know is the diameter of the lens, but any good camera shop will supply the filter at the same time as the camera.

Oh and Memory Cards.  There are slow ones and fast ones.  Get a large capacity fast one if the budget stretches.  I always shoot in RAW format which hammers the speed and memory capacity, but RAW gives you more options when you come to process your photos.
lherrou

The D90, in my opinion, is a better camera than both of the others, but it's definitely a step up in price - with the kit lens, you're looking at $1,100, compared to $700-750 for the other two.  

Here's some discussion of the issues around skylight filters for lens protection:
http://www.photocitizen.com/tips/protect-your-lens-with-a-uv-haze-or-skylight-filter-or-not/

I used to get a skylight filter for any lens I had. One day I realized that I had never had reason to replace one of those filters, and from that day forward, I stopped buying the filters. I do tend to take good care of my equipment, though, usually holding the lenscap in my hand while shooting and replacing it between shots or sequences, etc.



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moorhouselondon

aman0711

ASKER
One last question folks,

        I guess I will go with D90. Could you please suggest me a nice decent combo (Camera and Lens) for D90 from this link (I have a Dell Account:):

 http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/category.aspx?c=us&l=en&s=dhs&cs=19&category_id=6057&sort=price&~ck=anav&nf=67158~0~1332363&navla=67158~0~1332363
lherrou

From that link, I would get the Nikon D90 with the 18-105mm Lens - the other lenses are all zoom lenses, and won't lend themselves to landscapes, etc.
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aman0711

ASKER
@eGadgetGuy,
                              Someone in my office told me about that lens thing :)

I was so close to buying a D90 but then my friend brainwashed me that for a beginner D5000 and Canon Rebel 500D are more than enough.. Sorry folks I am bugging you again and again... For a starter do these cameras give everything?
eGadgetGuy

Everyone's a beginner some time. That's not the question you should ask. The question is, What are you going to DO with it? What's your target medium? also, how much $$ you got?

1. If you're taking pics to post online. DSLR is way too much, Infact, if you plan anything less than 8X10 portraits or landscapes (hey, where did you think printer paper alignment came from anyway?) than a DSLR is overkill. Also still stretching the ole' budget aren't we? the only real reason to get a DSLR is lens changes. Are you willing to fork out for a fisheye, a wide, and a telephoto or 2? or at least one wide AND one Tele? At least eventually. if not, go for a fixed lens model like the S10 IS Canon.

I still say the Canon (no matter the model) will give you better features and performance for the $$. Nikon is an elite camera, with advanced features, but some of them are harder to use than on the Canon IMO.

Good luck and happy shopping.
aman0711

ASKER
Ok My budget is close to 1000$ and right now I just want to explore photography, not sure if I will be bored with it soon or it will excite me to the fullest :)

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moorhouselondon

If you buy the technical reference manuals (for instance the Wiley range) for the cameras you are interested in, what is the cost of those compared to the cost of the camera itself?  It is a modest investment which will be repaid in terms of satisfaction of knowing not only that you've bought a good camera, but also knowing that you closed all the other avenues off such that you will never say "I wish I'd compared x with y".  

Cameras are a personal choice.  Look at the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.  Look at what these people take their shots with.  Do you see Nikon Nikon Nikon Nikon absolutely everywhere?  

http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit-us/whats-on/temporary-exhibitions/wpy/onlineGallery.do

Also: I would defo recommend you take a trip to a camera shop and hold these things in your hand, fire the shutter, see how intuitive they are compared to each other.  A good camera shop will give you that time and their advice for nothing... well, the prices might be slightly higher, but if you go this route, buy from them.
aman0711

ASKER
Folks,

           I apologize for the time I took :) Finally I have decided to stick with Canon T1i 500D.

           Now I am confused over the lens deals that come with it. Have you folks seen any good deal on this camera ?
aman0711

ASKER
I found this one, is it the same camera that Lherrou suggested me? what do think of this deal?

http://www.electrobrands.com/products.asp?engine=pricegrabber&product_id=13368
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aman0711

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lherrou

I encourage you to stick with B+H or Amazon.com (or your local camera store). You may pay a little more, but... (read this for the "..." http://beatthat.com/merchants/show/electrobrands)

As far as lenses go, get it with the basic kit lens, the 18-55, and learn the camera. No point in spending money on lenses right away - learn how you shoot, and how the basic kit lens limits you on that, and then you'll be ready to really make a selection on the lens(es) you need to grow and develop.
aman0711

ASKER
Hi lherrou,

                       I was waiting for your response :)
                       I finalized B&H.

                        Is this memory fast enough for this camera?

                        SanDisk                                                                           8GB Ultra SDHC Memory Card
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lherrou

p.s. If you want to spend a little more money, still I'd suggest skipping another lens for now, but instead get a decent flash, like the Canon 220EX Speedlite (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/121598-USA/Canon_2262A006_220EX_TTL_Flash.html). This will go a long way towards improving your photography as well, especially if you take the time to learn how to use bounce flash, etc.

lherrou

Yes, if it's the Ultra II, which I assume it is, is a good card. Get 2, so you can swap them.
aman0711

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lherrou

No, that's only 15mb/s Class 4 speed, you want to go to Class 6 speed, like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Sandisk-EXTREME-SDHC-SDSDX3-4096-Static/dp/B0017RLFM2/
lherrou

And, I would suggest getting two 4GB cards, rather than one 8GB, because you can swap them out of the camera. I have three cards, and rotate them, also if something goes wrong with a card, I haven't lost as much.
aman0711

ASKER
Cool thanks :)
 
Your help has saved me hundreds of hours of internet surfing.
fblack61
aman0711

ASKER
Folks,
           so I bought Canon Rebel T1i 500D with 18-55 Kit lens. As lherrou suggested I got two class 6 memory cards as well.
           Thank you all for the suggestions. I will close this question soon and open another one regarding Lenses and tips and suggestions to start this thing. In case I dont assign sufficient points, please do post in another question as well and I will make it up :)

aman0711

ASKER
Thanks folks :)