ip conflicts in SBS2003 network

I have a server running SBS2003 that is acting as the DHCP and DNS server. I also have some computers that access the network with peer-to-peer sharing. The problem that I am having is that I occasionally get an ip conflict that shuts down the network so that none of the computers can access the server. My solution is to release the ip on all of the computers and then renew. It seems like the peer-to-peer computers are causing the conflict but I am only guessing since I am not that knowledgeable about networks, especially having the server act as the DHCP
draw58Asked:
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Rob WilliamsConnect With a Mentor Commented:
>>"So if the server is turned off does that mean that we cant get any internet on the peer-to-peer computers?"
Coreect.
>>" Is this the way you would do it?""
Absolutly!
In a Windows domain you have no choice but to ue the SBS as your DNS server. Doing so, whether it hosts DHCP or not, means your clients loose internet connectivity as soon as the SBS goes off line. The only solution to this is to have a second domain controller in your domain. There are those that will tell you to use the SBS as the primary DNS server and then use the ISP as a secondary. Doing so will cause very slow logons and name resolution isssues. It is the #1 DNS mistake made.
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jpmortgageCommented:
Place the P2P users on a separate subnet?
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draw58Author Commented:
Sorry but I looked at the article and didn't understand how to configure a separate subnet. Should I add a separate NIC to the server or should I add a separate router? I could set it up so that the peer-to-peer computers don't have access to the server. I am looking for the easiest way to achieve the goal with the least amount of maintenance since I am a networking beginner.
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jpmortgageCommented:
Can you give us a network topology? IE: Number of servers/workstations/local users/remote users/VPN/Internet connection Type

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jpmortgageCommented:
Oh and also what type of router you have.
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draw58Author Commented:
I have one server running SBS2003. On that server I have 9 computers in the local domaim. I set them up using the connectcompuer method. I have 17 computers that are on the peer-to-peer network. (I plan on puting 4 of the 17 on the domain) I am not using a VPN connection and all users are local. I do not have exchange server configured. The main reason that I went with SBS2003 is because I will exceed my connections in Windows XP Pro with peer-to-peer. My router is Linksys and my internet is DSL with a fixed ip address.

If it would be easiser to add another NIC to the server for the peer-to-peer computers that would be fine.
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jpmortgageCommented:
Go into the routers configuration page and increase  the DHCP pool. You should not be maxing it out as there are not enough users to do that. That is the easiest solution. Or you can give every computer a static IP which is how my office is configured. The last set of numbers in the IP is the same as their computer name. Makes it easy to tell who is who.

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Rob WilliamsCommented:
No problem at all having peer-2-peer clients and domain clients sharing the same subnet and DHCP server. Make sure the SBS is the ONLY DHCP server, it probably is as its DHCP service will shut down if it finds another such as the router's being enabled. SBS must be the DHCP server and DNS server for all clients. Again make sure DHCP is disabled on the router. There is no problem having the peer-to-peer clients use the SBS for DHCP and DNS.
Then the only other way you could be having conflicts is if you have assigned some devices static IP's. If so, you need to define a range of IP's to be used for static addresses and create an exception for that range in the DHCP scope on the server. Better than static IP's with DHCP is to use DHCP reservations. If you need a hand with any of the DHCP configuration such as exceptions and reservations, please advise.
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draw58Author Commented:
I have three network printers. Do they have static ip addresses?
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
They may. It is common to do so. You would have to print out the printer config page to confirm. That could well be causing the problem.
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draw58Author Commented:
I t looks like this is the only printer or computer with a static ip
Oki C9850 192.168.1.57 Static IP
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jpmortgageCommented:
Then simply make a reservation for that one IP address and assign it to that device via MAC address. Once again, ensure that only ONE DHCP server is active on your network. Did you ever check how big the pool of available IP addresses were?
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
It only takes one duplicate IP to have a problem.
If that is the only one I would create an exclusion (sorry I said exception earlier) in the DHCP scope. To do so open the DHCP management console on the SBS | expand the server | expand the scope | right click on address pool and choose new exclusion range | enter 192.168.1.57  as the start and end IP

You might also want to make sure you are familiar with all devices on your network. You can run a Scan using a tool such as Angry IP Scanner (odd name I know, but good software, and safe):
http://www.angryip.org/w/Home
You might want to compare the discovered list with the "address leases" list in the DHCP console.
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draw58Author Commented:
It's like baking a cake just follow the directions and it easy. Thanks for your help.
So if the server is turned off does that mean that we cant get any internet on the peer-to-peer computers? Is this the way you would do it?
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draw58Author Commented:
Thanks a million!!
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
Thanks draw58.
Cheers!
--Rob
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