I get "The parameter is incorrect" in Disk Management

I get "The parameter is incorrect" in Disk Management when I try to mount an Equallogic SAN volume to an NTFS folder in Windows Server 2008 Enterprise. It works fine if I assign the volume to a drive letter but it won't let me mount it to an NTFS folder.
LarsArvidsonAsked:
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LarsArvidsonConnect With a Mentor Author Commented:
I tracked this problem down.  I'm unable to add mount points to a volume that has been assigned a drive letter which is part of a Windows 2008 Failover Cluster.  If I remove the drive letter from the cluster, I can then add volume mount points to the folder under the drive letter then I can add it back into the cluster.  I used to be able to do this as of a month or so ago.  Why can't I anymore?  
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DavidPresidentCommented:
That makes perfect sense.  A volume is a logical disk drive, that appears as a physical disk drive to your O/S, just like a mechanical HD appears.  You have to assign a drive letter.    Can you assign a drive letter to C:\tmp?  Same thing.  
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DavidPresidentCommented:
(well there are ways to assign drive letters to directories, but you can't assign a drive letter to C:\tmp, UNTIL you mount C:\

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LarsArvidsonAuthor Commented:
Maybe you misunderstood my issue.  I don't want to assign a drive letter to, I want to mount the SAN volume to folder that is located under a drive letter.  That drive letter happens to be another SAN volume.  

-I'm able to mount the SAN volume to a folder on a local drive (i.e. c:\mountpoint)
-I can't, however, mount that same SAN volume to a folder that I created under a drive letter that is actually a SAN volume (i.e. V:\mountpoint)  
-both mountpoints have the same NTFS permissions.  
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LarsArvidsonAuthor Commented:
I've done this a bunch of times in the past w/o any issues.  
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DavidPresidentCommented:
no problem closing it, but I do ask that just for my own selfish desire to learn something, that it would be nice to know specifics of what Lars found out.
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rinkerlanCommented:
Just to explain the details, this happens when your mount point root drive is not in maintenance mode.  When you attempt to generate a new Volume mount point within another clustered volume (For instance you have F:\ as a clustered volume and are trying to generate a mount point F:\SQL-DATA\ ) the node OS has to have full ownership to write the appropriate mount point data in the index.  This is made possible in clustering by putting the master disk and new disk in maint mode, then creating the mount point and putting both disks back active.
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