mac mail set default to sort newest messages on top for all mailboxes

Is there a way to set Mail's default to sort newest messages to the top on all mailboxes?
tj-aAsked:
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Sigurdur ArmannssonDesigner Commented:
You can put many different columns on you message viewer by right clicking on the bar. Make sure Date Received is one.

Then click on the bar where Date Received is, once or twice until the messages are on top.

You may have to do this for every subfolder but if you need to do this for all accounts inboxes you select the Inbox, which includes all accounts.

Something like this you were looking for?
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tj-aAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the reply.  I knew how to sort with the bar, but it only affects the selected mailbox.  I tried selecting Inbox, Sent, etc and then sorting, but that only changed that top level view.

I'd like to set it somewhere and then have that setting propagate to each mailbox under Inbox, Sent, etc.
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Sigurdur ArmannssonDesigner Commented:
I browsed arround and it does not seem to be any one trick pony for this. I even read this fantastic list in search for alternatives: http://www.hawkwings.net/plugins.htm


Personally I prefer to have new mail at the bottom and I looked into several (I have 80+ subfolders) and they all stick to that position once I have set it so.
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marookCommented:
To be honest, I haven't found a way to set this default (yet), and I have been looking for year!

Mail default to Nevest at the Buttom, and I don't like that either.. :-(

So when ever I re-connect to a mailaccount, I have to go through ALL folder and chnage the sort order.. bummer!
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marookCommented:
Update:

There is no support for setting the SortOrder via AppleScript.

The Sort Order is set for each mailbox in the Info.plist file:

~/Library/Mail/MailAccountFolder/Mailbox.imapmbox/Info.plist

So, it should be possible to write a script to do this - but I don't have the time right now.
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tj-aAuthor Commented:
sigurarm, thanks for the link.  it has some cool stuff and I bookmarked it, but it doesn't have what I'm looking for.

marook, I began to wonder if it would be best to script it.  assuming I'd have to script for each mailbox/sub-mailbox, it shouldn't be too bad (mainly, like you, finding time to do it)

I'm a newbie to AppleScript (I typically do bash scripting) so if you have any suggestions on where I could get info on it, I'd appreciate it.
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Bryan_VinesCommented:
Just a quick suggestion - If you're used to shell scripting, go for it. Use the defaults write command or the PlistBuddy command to set a value in a plist file.

Here's Apple's defaults man page, and here's Apple's PlistBuddy man page.

Note that PlistBuddy must be invoked in this manner: /usr/libexec/PlistBuddy

Good luck!
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tj-aAuthor Commented:
Looks like scripting is the way to go ... when there's time!
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