Pros and Cons of using Oracle on Linux RedHat

I am in the process of setting up a consolidation model for a large architecture projetct and I am  looking for the Pro's and Con's of consolidating several thousands Oracle systems using Linux vs using HPUX or AIX.  My Oracle backgroung being very limited, I would appreciate if somebody could help me on that with previous experiences, articles, guidelines.

Thanks you...
LVL 23
Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
The alert went out for extra help on this question.  I'm afraid my UNIX is pretty old and out of the list was limited to HP/UX.

I'll offer what little advice I can:

The best PRO for Linux is cost and the fact Oracle is developed on Linux.

I guess Oracle being developed there can also be a CON:  Since it's the first OS to be released, it is also likely to be the buggiest.

Linux doesn't tie you to a specific hardware platform.

You also have to look at total cost of ownership.  Back when I was an HP/UX Admin and DBA, I knew HP hardware rather well and could quickly resolve most error codes/faults.  If I suddenly moved to an AIX environment, I would be lost for a while with the new hardware and 'tweaks' in the OS.

I believe Oracle is pretty much constant across the *NIX platforms.  There might be some minor differences in Kernel tunables but I don't think it would be that bad.  Like above, the DBAs will need to learn a new hardware architecture but hopefully they could do it easier than the sys admins since they don't need to know it at their level.

In the long run, I would think consolidating to a single OS would be the right move.  Sorry I can't provide any papers to help you prove it.

If you have any other questions I'll do my best to answer them.

0
Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
RedHat Linux is an excellent platform for Oracle databases,  Actually you may want to consider Oracle Enterprise Linux, instead of RedHat linux, since they are indentical (except for the logos and a few icons if/when you run a GUI shell on Linux) and Linux support is cheaper from Oracle than from RedHat.

I ran and supported Oracle databases on Windows for 10 years before we switched to RedHat Linux (then to Oracle Enterprise Linux after that was released).  I had no Unix background, so for me the switch to Linux was not easy.  But, after getting through the initial config challenge on Linux, Linux is a *MUCH* more stable server operating system than Windows is.  It works very well fo us.  For comparison, in our last year on Windows, we averaged a crash a week ,and that was with a scheduled weekend database shutdown followed by a server reboot.  On Linux, we've had three crashes in five years without weekly shutdowns.
0
Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistAuthor Commented:
<<If you have any other questions I'll do my best to answer them.>>
Thank you for your feedback.
I would be interested in having your opinion about dealing with a large number of databases on a non supported OS like Linux [let’s say less supported] (both mission critical and with large size > 1.5 TB)
I have had some trouble in the past with RedHat support, they tend to send you back to your HW vendor whenever a tricky problem comes in.

 
0
Determine the Perfect Price for Your IT Services

Do you wonder if your IT business is truly profitable or if you should raise your prices? Learn how to calculate your overhead burden with our free interactive tool and use it to determine the right price for your IT services. Download your free eBook now!

slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
I'm afraid I probably can't help much on that one.

Maybe I've been lucky in my career but I've never really had large numbers of databases.  At most a small handful.

I will say that Oracle was made to run on *NIX.  I'm on Windows now and absolutely hate it (good thing that isn't one of your choices).

All of my *NIX Oracle has been on HP/UX so I really can't help out much there either.
0
Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
i also have never supported a large number of Oracle databases, but I find the combination of Oracle and Linux to work very well, especially with Linux support from Oracle.  That way, the database and O/S support come from the same organization, so there is no finger-pointing to another vendor.

I'm curious, you are using the word "database" with the meaning it usually has in Oracle, correct?  (That is different from the meaning it has in a SQL Server environment.)  Exactly how many databases do you need (or plan) to support per server?  Do they all need to be separate databases (instances) or could some of them be combined as separate schemas in fewer databases?
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistAuthor Commented:
<<I'm afraid I probably can't help much on that one.>>
Thank you for trying...Appreciate your feedback...

Being from a SQL Server background, I would not complain as much about Windows as I would about Windows administrators.  Though the OS is less stable than Unix, Linux or Mac OS x, the vast majority of problems occurring on Windows are less a consequence of the OS quality than a consequence of the lack of skills of Windows administrators who are using it...

But that is just my opinion...
0
slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
I tend to agree but that also spans more than Windows:  Many Oracle problems are because of unskilled admins/developers.

Notice I didn't bash Windows itself, just Oracle on Windows.  Oracle ports from Linux to Windows are pretty problematic.  One of the main things is going from a multi-process to Windows threading.  The threading is also hard for DBAs to wrap their heads around.  It was foreign territory for me years ago when I moved from UNIX to Windows.

Check out the Oracle download page.  See when the Windows version is released...  11gR2 still isn't out yet.  I also bet it is extremely buggy when it is released (I ALWAYS wait for at least the first patchset before I ever get serious out upgrades).
0
Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
OK, when you say that you are from a SQL Server background, that changes the meaning of what you said earlier about "a large number of databases".  You may find that in Oracle, you really only need one database (at least based on how Oracle uses the term "database").

You may find that the management tools for Oracle are not as user-friendly as the management tools for SQL Server.  But the Oracle database product is more stable, more scalable and more tunable than SQL Server is.  This means that you do need to spend some time tuning/configuring Oracle for a particular server (amount of RAM, number and type of disk drives, etc.) and a particular application (OLTP, Data Warehouse, mixed, etc.) but if this is done properly, you should be able to get performance that beats what SQL Server can deliver on the same hardware.
0
Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
I happen to like Oracle on WIndows and find that combination very easy to manage and one that performs well (but then I have lots of experience with Windows servers and no Unix experience).  I will say again though that Oracle on Linux is more stable than Oracle on Windows.
0
Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistAuthor Commented:
<<OK, when you say that you are from a SQL Server background, that changes the meaning of what you said earlier about "a large number of databases".  You may find that in Oracle, you really only need one database (at least based on how Oracle uses the term "database").>>
When using the term *databases*, I really meant it as Oracle databases.  I am aware of the terminology differences concernin the two technologies.  I used *databases* as a synonym for *instance* on SQL Server.  SQL Server *databases* are the equivalent of *schemas* under Oracle (while *schemas* mean something else under SQL Server).  

The point of my inquiry is to get a better grasp of the ROI issues concerning the large scale deployment of Oracle on Linux OS's as opposed to deploying them on traditional HP UX and AIX operating systems.  Is there a gain on TCO ?  What are the Pros and Cons of deploying (perhaps I should have asked the question that way) Oracle on Linux as opposed to deploying them on HP UX and AIX.  I don't think I am interested in knowing much about Oracle on Windows as this is not a traditional OS for Oracle.

Hoping I clarified the scope of my question.

0
slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
I understood the question (at least I think I did). I'm sorry we got off topic and sort of turned this into a Windows debate.

Since there are only two Experts here and this has probably gone a little stale you might think about using the 'Request Attention' link up top and see if we can get some more Experts involved.
0
Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
If you could get hardware and software for UNIX for the same cost as you can for Linux, then there may be no difference in ROI.  For most of though (assuming no connection to a hardware vendor) there is no way that UNIX can come close to the cost of running Oracle on Linux.  For what its worth, Oracle runs their own large data centers on Linux.
0
slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
There are a few more possible costs:  Oracle license (after you try to figure out the CPU core math Oracle has).

If you can get it paired down to an apple to apple comparison:  Can one PA/RISC HP/UX CPU out perform one X (whatever box you buy to host Linux) CPU?  This might make Oracle server licenses cheaper.
0
Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistAuthor Commented:
<<Since there are only two Experts here and this has probably gone a little stale you might think about using the 'Request Attention' link up top and see if we can get some more Experts involved.>>
Thank you for the suggestion. I will do that.
0
Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistAuthor Commented:
<<For what its worth, Oracle runs their own large data centers on Linux.>>
Do you by any chance have documentation on that ?  It  would be helpful to look an already set up architecture.
0
Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
No, I don't have written documentation on Oracle's server hardware.  (I don't know if they publicize that or not.)  But, before our organization decided to go with a large Oracle EBS implementation (large for us anyway) a year ago, Oracle invited some of us to tour their Austin, TX data center.  We saw thousands of Linux servers there hosting databases for lots of Oracle customers.  We chose to keep our data in-house, but that might be an option for you to consider: having Oracle host your data and manage the servers, backups, O/S and database upgrades, etc. for you.
0
slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
>>Oracle invited some of us to tour their Austin, TX data center

lol... I got that same invite.  They are proud of it and LOVE to show it off.  Someday I hope I can take them up on it!!!


I'm sure if you Google that data center you can find papers on it:

http://www.oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-linuxsupp/linux_austin.html

http://www.oracle.com/newsletters/information-indepth/on-demand/nov-08/sequoia.html
0
Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys...Appreciate your help and advice on that...

Let me know when you need help on SQL Server side...:)
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Oracle Database

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.