Mount UNC path as a folder

Hey all.  Does anyone know of a way to mount a unc path as a folder??
nyceuserAsked:
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bobross419Commented:
We add UNC paths as Shortcuts all the time.  Just create like a normal shortcut, but use the UNC Path as the target.
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Gregory_VCommented:
You mean, use the map drive option when you right click my computer, or via tools menu from explorer?
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nyceuserAuthor Commented:
is there a way to access a shortcut like that through dos?
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nyceuserAuthor Commented:
Either or..basically we we want to map it as a folder and not as a drive...for ftp purposes.
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Death259Commented:
Your best bet would be to map it as a network drive. In windows XP go to my computer then go to tools and map network drive. If you have the path you can paste it into the folder box, or you can browse for it. This will assign the unc path a letter which you can then use in dos.

You can acccess your new mapped drive by using: "cd X:\" (minus the quotes) where X is the new drive letter.
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bobross419Commented:
If you run the shortcut name at a command prompt:
C:\Documents and Settings\bobross419\Desktop>shortcutToShare.lnk

It will open up the directory window, I don't think you can get to it via command line without doing a pushd \\uncpath
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nyceuserAuthor Commented:
The problem with mapping a drive is that we need to see the path as a folder and not a drive letter.
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bobross419Commented:
You'd run into the same problem using the method I suggested because you won't be able to get to it without doing a pushd, which maps the drive.
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thompsonwirelessCommented:
You can access a UNC path with a command prompt, using a batch file, etc.  You're saying Mount...which in Windows terminology means mapping a drive letter to your destination.
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EnriquePhoenixCommented:
This is kinda convoluted, but mount the folder as a drive. Then Create a folder inside of your newly mounted drive. Now you won't have to use the root of the drive but a folder on the root of your drive.
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Jackie ManCommented:
The answer is NO. But, there maybe a workaround on how to FTP the content inside a UNC path to a remote site as shown in the URL below.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Misc/Q_22039406.html
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B HCommented:
can you describe a little more about what you want the ftp to do?  is "the folder" going to be accessed locally by a local ftp server, or accessed locally by a local ftp client?

if you're running a local ftp server that needs to see "the folder", what is the name of the ftp server?

what do you mean by "we need to see the path as a folder and not a drive letter"...  are you trying to call it by something like:
 ..\..\some\folder\file  using relative paths?  do you not have the ability to call it by a name such as m:\some\folder\file ?
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yodabugCommented:
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bobross419Commented:
I tried that with a network drive and couldn't get it to work.  Could you elaborate yoda?
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yodabugCommented:
My apologies, junctions must be used for directories and junctions are not supported on network shares in windows. Since Windows networks use CIFS to share resources this of course would not work.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896768.aspx

You may be able to do something if you enable SFU (Services for Unix) on the server that hosts the shares in question, I would however, have to research that myself.
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andrewrnzCommented:
I don't understand why it needs to be a folder and not a drive letter. What difference does it make? You can authenticate a UNC path via vbscript which will make a connection without mapping a drive letter (using wnetaddconnection2). Would that help?
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