What's the ideal file size for a 2 min video?

Hi,
For video 583x328px, what's the best file size I can shot for for a two minute video that will still render high-quality. What's the best format for compression? Ideally, I would like to use flash so that I'm using one video format for the entire website i'm working on - already have a couple of very short flash presentations posted. Are there instructions that someone could suggest for getting excellent compression results with flash.

Thanks,
Sam
SamuelMillerAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
danyul_cConnect With a Mentor Commented:
There are no set standards for what is an ideal file size for this. There are numerous things that can make a video better quality  than one that is larger than it. First of all you would need to determine what type of video you are trying to compress. Is it a cartoon, a fairly steady slow live action shot, a fast paced action shot, a low framerate presentation?

Things like cartoons and low framerate presentations will ALWAYS compress to a smaller size than their live action counterparts simply because when you compress a video you will have keyframes which are whole single frames. But, the information stored in between these keyframes lets the player know which pixels have changed and to which colour for each frame (because not every pixel will need to change colour). That is basically how most compression works.

The main control you have over this is what codec you use. If you are making something that is going to be in flash then I suggest using the On2 VP6 codec for an FLV or encoding it as H.264 for an MP4 file (flash can play both). They provide the best compression results for file size that I have come across. So to compress it you're going to need something like Sorenson Squeeze.

Options you can configure are the bitrate (lower equals smaller file size but loss of quality), the number of keytframes (more keyframes = larger files but for fast action can provide a marked improvement in quality). When you compress you should use 2-pass encoding so that the first one looks for places to make improvements and the second pass actually makes the improvements.

But based on the type of video and the quality you are after, you will have to tweak the bitrate to find something you are happy with, both quality and size wise. I would think, off the top of my head, something between 700 - 800kbps bit rate would give you a good picture quality for a basic youtube type video.
0
 
Jason C. LevineNo oneCommented:
Excellent post danyul_c
0
 
SamuelMillerAuthor Commented:
Yes, great post. The Sorenson Squeeze software seems excellent; However, it an't cheap at $500 for the flash version. But I guess you get what you pay for, eh? I wonder if there are any cheaper alternatives with the similar user friendliness.

Thanks,
Sam
0
Never miss a deadline with monday.com

The revolutionary project management tool is here!   Plan visually with a single glance and make sure your projects get done.

 
Jason C. LevineNo oneCommented:
I have had a lot of success using FFMPEG (via WinFF mostly) to convert files and retain quality while losing size.   Once you learn the ins and outs of the program, it's great.  Not NEARLY as user friendly as Sorenson but you can't beat the price (free).
0
 
SamuelMillerAuthor Commented:
Has anyone have any experience with this software:
http://www.squared5.com/svideo/mpeg-streamclip-mac.html
It looks a little more user friendly than FFMPEG and it's free as well.
Sam
0
 
Jason C. LevineNo oneCommented:
It's a bit different.  Streamclip is more of an editor than ffmpeg is.  ffmpeg is a command line utility and WinFF is a GUI for it.  But I use both (for different things) and like both.
0
 
danyul_cCommented:
I am just commenting out of experience with what I have done.

ffmpeg is great software especially for the price of it. It is in this years Google summer of code so expect some great improvements to come in the codecs and audio areas. I use ffmpeg in linux and have had varying degrees of success. I find sorenson provides the best quality v. compression standards bar none but yeah, it's got a price tag attached.
0
All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.