Corel JPGs not visible to Internet Explorer

I'm using Corel PhotoPaint 10. A friend of mine is using Corel PhotoPaint 14 and is having the same problem...

When we create high resolution JPG files with PhotoPaint, they can not be seen with Internet Explorer. I've tried with ver 6, 7 and 8, all at default settings.

The files show up as little boxes with red X in them regardless of the dimensions of the file. I know it's there, because, if I right-click the file and say "save target as", I can save it to my desktop, double click it and see it. If I open the file with Microsoft picture publisher or Paint, modify a pixel and save it, it is fully visible on the web page. The resultant image quality is lost, of course.
What is my (and my friend's) PhotoPaint doing to the files that is making them incompatible?
LVL 1
MarcusPfeifferAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

MereteCommented:
Sounds like one of the settings in IE internet options> advanced is not active, under multimedia it shoul dhave show pictures ticked.
or it's not supported
but check this
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283807
Are just opening it with IE or imbedding it?
0
Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
If I recall correctly, CorelPhoto has never played well with IE; it's been a long time since I used Corel's photo program, but it seems like that was why I stopped.

Try exporting the files as PNG files and see if it helps.
0
MarcusPfeifferAuthor Commented:
I can't afford to make any modifications to IE to solve the problem. It has to work with IE by default. It's on a website.

As I mentioned, if I edit even a single pixel and resave it with another program, it works just fine. Something in the Corel settings is not compatible with IExplore.
0
Cloud Class® Course: CompTIA Healthcare IT Tech

This course will help prep you to earn the CompTIA Healthcare IT Technician certification showing that you have the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in installing, managing, and troubleshooting IT systems in medical and clinical settings.

Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
That's what I said. You won't make any changes to IE. Just save the images as .PNG files instead of .JPG files. It's the Corel method of creating .JPG files that's the problem.

ep
0
MarcusPfeifferAuthor Commented:
PNG isn't a supported file type with Corel 10.
This particular web page requires high resolution graphics and have to be downloadable for printing. Some print places that the agents use for printing only take JPG and PDF anyway.

JPG is a "standard"... where is the Corel encoding going wrong?
0
Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
I'm not a programmer; it's somewhere in Corel's system.

Can you export as a PNG? or some other file type, and then import it into, say, Windows' Paint and save it as a JPG file there? I realize it's a workaround, but I don't know of any setting in PhotoPaint you can change to make them play nicely with IE.

ep
0
MereteCommented:
I have PSP7 and all I can find in File > preferences>General  preferences Warnings> is the option to remove all warnings. in Browser You can also set it to use windows colours that maybe the problem, if IE is set to use windows colours as well. In Internet options>appearance. I know the active X since MS removed it can cause all sorts of problems with images not displaying right.
This article describes how to troubleshoot an issue in which pictures (graphics or images) are not displayed on Web sites in Internet Explorer
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283807


0
MarcusPfeifferAuthor Commented:
I've come across that article before but it deals primarily with modifying Explorer. I have to leave the Explorer alone because Joe-Q-Public has to be able to see these images with default browsers.
When I right-click the little box that should have been an image, I get "not available" in all of the properties descriptions.

Eric... Every program can open up my JPGs and view/edit them, except IExplore. There's no need to export to anything but JPG. As soon as I open the JPG with any other program and save it back as a JPG, it works perfectly fine. I want my Corel to crete a JPG that works fine.

It must be a code page problem or some other encapsulated code that IE doesn't understand.
0
BillDLCommented:
Hello Marcus

>>> "... if I edit even a single pixel and resave it with another program, it works just fine" <<<

Yes, that's because the other program is encoding it differently by the sound of it.  It probably wouldn't matter if you edited 100 pixels or none at all and did a Save As in the other program, it would still use whatever JPEG-JFIF format encoder that program is configured to use and there is obviously some difference.

>>> "JPG is a "standard". Where is the Corel encoding going wrong?" <<<

Have you considered that the JPEG-JFIF encoder used by your Corel application may be corrupted, and may be adding non-conforming file header information to the images whereby Internet Explorer has difficulty knowing what the file is?  I mean something small that wouldn't necessarily stop the image loading in an image editor, but just enough to cause an issue in IE.  Perhaps performing a repair of the application may fix such an issue if this is the root cause.

Perhaps your images saved out with Corel contain layers, or something along those lines, that prevents IE displaying them properly, but that other programs flatten out when the images are saved out from them.

Would it be possible for you to attach an example image saved in exactly the same way as you have been doing, and one that you confirm to have the same problem in Internet Explorer as the high resolution ones that have been failing.  I (and I'm sure others) would probably find it easier to suggest the cause if we could analyse the image.  It would also be useful if you could take that same image and do a Save As in the other program, confirm it to display fine in Internet Explorer, and attach it here so we can compare the differences between the two.

If you don't wish to attach any sample images, then could you please do as above and separately load each image in any image editing application that shows the most detail of the image properties and provide us with the details.  For example you may find the "Image Information" option under the "Image" menu or perhaps the "File" menu.  As much detail as possible will be helpful.  The free IrfanView program shows quite comprehensive properties.

When you do a File > Save As action and the dialog comes up, do you see a check-box or a button entitled "Options" in that "Save As" dialog?  If so, click it and see what options it allows you to enable or disable.

There will usually be a 0% to 100% (or 1% to 99%) slider with which to set the quality or compression.  You want high resolution images for printing, so set it either to 0% compression or 100% quality, whichever way it describes the setting.  If it gives the choice of "Progressive" or "Standard" encoding, then experiment by doing a Save As to different file names to test the results in a web page. Progressive encoding displays a rough, blurry image that sharpens as it downloads and becomes visible in a web page.  Standard encoding makes the image display from top to bottom when viewed in a web page.

When you say that you have tested and confirmed the same problem with the Corel JPG's in IE 6, 7, and 8, do you mean that you have physically viewed the web page from a web server over the Internet in IE, or have you only thus far viewed your "Web" from local folders?

Bill
0
ddhammCommented:
One way we could eliminate whether the image has a problem or it is just a browswer setting is if you would share the url of the website. Then, if we can see the images, the images don't have a problem (but you might just have to change some settings in the I.E. browser options)

Also, what software are you using to create the webpages - there can be issues using FrontPage.

DeeDee
0
MarcusPfeifferAuthor Commented:
I'm actually just using plain HTML. I'll do some attaching tomorrow.
0
MarcusPfeifferAuthor Commented:
I still haven't had a response that makes the Corel file work on the Explorer. I'm trying to avoid the use of a third program to read and re-write the data to be compatible.
The strange thing is that it's just Explorer (both 7 and 8) that can't see it. Every other program on Earth can open the JPG created by my Corel.
0
MarcusPfeifferAuthor Commented:
Have a look at the http://www.pfeifferonline.net/stonemill/download folder on my machine...

There's a high-res JPG which I created with Corel 10. It's not visible in Explorer, but you can download it and open it anywhere else.

0
Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
One possibility is that the jpg file was saved using the CMYK color pallette; that won't work in IE. Make sure you're using the RGB pallette (24-bit).

ep
0
David S.Commented:
ericpete seems to be correct. When I open that 11.5MB JPEG file in Photoshop, it indicates that the image is in CMYK mode.

Yes, resaving a JPEG loses image quality because that format uses "lossy compression". (Which is why PNG-24 was suggested because it uses "lossless compression".)

My Google search seems to indicate that Photopaint may not provide a tool to convert from CMYK to RGB. Therefore, I suggest that you save the image as a PNG and then use a free tool, like Irfanview (http://irfanview.com/), to convert it to JPEG.
0
Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
Kravimir,

Thanks. I actually use Microsoft's old Image Composer software (it was the only thing on the old FrontPage 98 CD worth having), but it does the same thing.

The information I've found on the subject suggests that Corel saves .jpg files using the 32-bit color scheme; Microsoft's browser can't handle that, and doesn't mind .jpg files as long as they're saved as 24-bit color -- the RGB scheme.

I've found the same problem with Adobe's products (and Macromedia's, since Adobe took them over). The best solution always seems to be to use .png files.

ep
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Web Browsers

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.