Connecting a DSL Modem cum Router to a router

I had cable internet for a very long time. With cable internet there is hardly any problem in configuring the cable
modem and the router because a cable modem normally is without a router it does not have its own IP
Address you only have to configure the router and if it is a DHCP IP Address i.e dynamic Address it is even more easy.
Recently I also signed up for DSL. THE ISP gave me  ZTE-831 which is a DSL modem with a 4-port router. It has it's own
IP Address 192.168.1.10. I connected it to a D-Link Router DIR 655 which has an IP Address of 192.168.0.1. If the configuration
settings of the DLink Router is set  to dynamic it works. The Gateway which used to be 192.168.0.1 when only the Dlink Router was used and no other router[typical scenario when used with a cable modem] is now 192.168.1.10 which is the the IP Address of the ZTE-831. What does this signify? Are both routers being used or only one?
 If ZTE -831 is also a router besides a DSL modem then can it be directly connected to a switch bypassing the Dlink?
The DLink and ZTE-831 IP addresses are on different subnets which means that they have their own private networks. If the
Dlink router is connected as well as the ZTE-831 what static addresses should be given so that they work [this is  necessary in case of Windows 2008 Server]. Secondly to avoid this imbroglio why not have a DSL modem without a built in router?
SALEM586Asked:
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
>>What does this signify? Are both routers being used or only one?
Yes, both routers are being used. They are on different subnets, so you internal network is connecting to the D-Link router, which is in turn routing the traffic out to the ZTE-831, which in turn is routing traffic to the Internet.
>>If ZTE -831 is also a router besides a DSL modem then can it be directly connected to a switch bypassing the Dlink?
Yes. Unless there is a specific reason for having the D-Link connected, you can take it out of the mix.
>>IF the Dlink router is connected as well as the ZTE-831 what static addresses should be given so that they work [this is  necessary in case of Windows 2008 Server].
With the D-Link router in the mix, your internal IP network would be 192.168.0.1/24. So, your server would have a static IP address in the range of 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.254, with a default gateway of 192.168.0.1. The external (WAN) port of the D-Link would be set to get a dynamic IP address, which would be provided by the ZTE-831 in the 192.168.1.x subnet.
>>Secondly to avoid this imbroglio why not have a DSL modem without a built in router?
Most ISP's provide a modem/router combination because they want to provide their customers with a built-in firewall/router so that you don't need another router. I'm not familiar with the ZTE-831, so I can't give specific instructions to you, but another option would be to put this device (the ZTE-831) in bridge mode, turning off all routing and firewall functions, so that it would simply pass traffic through to the D-Link without filtering. The D-Link would then get a dynamic IP address and DNS information directly from the ISP.
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lanboyoCommented:
Hypercat is correct, you are double NATing, and if you trust the security of the telcom provided ZTE-831 then you have no need of the other router.

The provider prefers a router to just a simple bridging modem because if it is in bridging mode then some network bandwidth may be wasted on broadcast data that has no need or reason to go to the ISP, the router will filter anything that is not an IP packet going out to the internet.

Also since this is the desired configuration for most people, and the provider doesn't pay much if anything for a DSL modem with an integrated router, why not configure it in this way?

If the provider uses PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE) then the modem/router has the added advantage that you do not need to run a PPPoE shim on the customer devices, which is quite a pain.

Some issues:

If the provider uses PPPoE bridging will require the transfer of the username and password configuration for that.

If the provider uses DHCP  to assign addresses on the customer link, then they may have configured the mac address of the ZTE-831 to be the only device allowed to get a DHCP address on the link, so if you configure it for passthru then the DLINK may not be able to get a DHCP address on the network. You can use mac cloning to get around this.

Finally, if you use both routers configured  inline then to do any port mapping/translations to allow an inbound connection from the internet it will require you to set it up on both routers.


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lanboyoCommented:
The default password for  the router is usually something like this:

Configure to Router mode

   1. Login to http://192.168.1.1 with the username and password (Case sensitive).

      username : ADSL
      password: expert03

      Note: “03" read “zero three”.

      OR,

      username : ZXDSL
      password: ZXDSL
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SALEM586Author Commented:
The compelling reason to use DLink router is that it is a wired and wireless N-router and so it can take stock of my wireless devices. It is pretty fast much faster than the Linksys WRT54GS which I had used before temporarily and again taken it out of hibernation for my cable internet. DLink DIR 655 was supposed to be one of the top notched and fastest routers for the home user two or three years ago as said by smallNetbuilder. Previously I was using the DLink DGL 4300 GamerLounge another fast and well reputed home router which unfortunately stopped working properly.
ZTE-831 is a product of a Chinese Telecom ZTE which has so far not graced any computer magazine or website charts that I know of.
Why to have DSL when I already have Cable Internet is that sometimes the Cable Internet does not work and vice versa so that I am not out of broadband internet. Cable Internet is easier to configure.
I really appreciate the responses given to my request.
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SALEM586Author Commented:
Very swift and point to point reply which is superb.
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