Public/Private static ip address

Hi Guys

I am trying to set up my own web server, i thought i need to assign 1 static ip address to this pc(web server), the IT guy is asking me if we need a public static or a private static, i am assuming we nedd a public static, but i do not have clear understanding of the difference, can you please explain

this web server will be hosting  a database and allow access to it to web users

thanks
titorober23Asked:
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willk400Connect With a Mentor Commented:
You would need a public IP if the site needs to be used at all to the outside world. Some people use privite IP when they have a company site that is only used in office and never needed to be accessed outside of that.
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titorober23Author Commented:
do you set  public vs private or the ISP  set that up?
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SnibborgConnect With a Mentor OwnerCommented:
The usual process is to have a public static IP address and get your router to forward to the ports you need to an internal address that has a private address of, for example 192.168.0.xxx.  Make sure you forward all the ports you need.

Usually private addresses are set up by either your own router, your DHCP server or with a fixed IP address on the internal side.  

The only other thing I can think of is that your server is being hosted by the ISP itself and they are asking the question as to whether your own network are the only people who are going to access its resources (in which case private will d the job) or whether this is going to be a web server that is accessed by the general public (in which case a public IP address will be required).
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farel007Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Your ISP reserved some public IP adress for You. It can be static or dynamic. You must ask Your ISP what they are and ask him is there static?
If only one IP public static address is reserved for You, probably is already assigned to your Router. In this case, if your router performing NAT, your IT guy must configure NAT to allow web serwer to access from the Web. Your IT guy must then configure router and Web serwer to use an static private IP.
If your ISP cannot reserved for you some public static IP, change the ISP. If you cannot use other ISP service, your last chance is subscribe a DynamicDNS service. It allow web serwer to access from the web when an IP address is dynamic. But in some cases (in seriously business) it is'n acceptable.
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titorober23Author Commented:
we have 5 static ips, one is already asssign to the router, so the other could be assign to this web server?
or should be a different way?
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SnibborgOwnerCommented:
No, that will work fine, then just do port forwarding for that IP address.
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titorober23Author Commented:
so you mean assign an internal or private static ip address to the web server(machine) and do a port forwarding to this ip.
That means i won't be using another static ip from the 5 taht i receive, i only use one for the router and keep extra 4.
is this correct?
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SnibborgConnect With a Mentor OwnerCommented:
You need to assign a internal static IP address that will always be linked to one of the fixed IP addresses that you have been provided by your ISP.  You will need to make sure that your router is set so that the port forwarding is then routed between the internal IP address of the web server and one of the public addresses.

In effect anyone who accesses the public IP address will then get automatically routed to your internally addressed Web server.

External (ie 87.236.42.70) <-----> router <-------> Web server (ie 192.168.0.50)

The router translates the ip addresses automatically once it is set up.

Make sure that your web server has a fixed private IP address, otherwise if DHCP decides to give your web server a new IP address then your web site will go down.  You can either get DHCP to allocate a fixed IP address (using the MAC address as ID) or you can use a fixed IP address that is outside the DHCP range.  For example if your DHCP scope is 192.168.0.10 to 192.168.0.50, then use 192.168.0.200.

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