How to Install Wordpad on a different partition?

I have a client that has a computer that came from dell with the recovery partition as C:\ and the system partition where Windows installed as d:

They have an application that has to have wordpad installed on the C:\ partition in order to recongnize it.

Does anyone know of a way to install wordpad on a partition other that the system partition?

This particular application has to use wordpad to view reports.

Thank you.
dolphan2013Asked:
Who is Participating?
 
B HConnect With a Mentor Commented:
clarification:  if your recovery partition is NOT already called C:, then you can simply add an additional drive letter to your D drive, calling it C... so it will be called C:\ and D:\ at the same time.  this eliminates the need for the SUBST command
0
 
ignescentCommented:
wordpad is a pretty self-contained app - it's possible that it will work if you just put a copy of the exe where it's expected to be by the application in question, and it'll run from there.
0
 
dolphan2013Author Commented:
Actually, instead of this, I think I have decided it might be more prudent to change the system/boot partition from d: to C;. I know this is not a great method. Do sny of you know the MS KB to do this?

Thanks

0
Free Tool: ZipGrep

ZipGrep is a utility that can list and search zip (.war, .ear, .jar, etc) archives for text patterns, without the need to extract the archive's contents.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way to say thank you for being a part of the community.

 
B HCommented:
can you actually access the recovery partition as C:\ ?
like, start > run >  c:   [click ok]   ?

you could change the recovery partition to something like, x:\   and then substitute c: to point to d:

to change the recovery partition:
right click my computer, manage
disk management
right-click the recovery partition (on the bottom), change drive letter, pick something else, ok

to substitute the letter C to point to the D drive, do this:
start > run > cmd  [click ok]
subst c: d:\


then you're free to call things like c:\windows\whatever.exe
0
 
dolphan2013Author Commented:
Thanks. I will try that for a shortterm solution.
0
 
B HCommented:
the problem with changing the boot partitions is, everything installed already expects d:\ everywhere...  d:\program files\etc...  it's already written into files strewn about.  you can get windows to think it's on C, but most programs won't work anymore
0
All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.