VMWare Redundancy

We are virtualizing our operation in the next couple of months and have a question about redundancy.

Our core infrastructure will consist  2  VM hosts, a management machine and a equaligic 6000 xv SAN.

We'd like to be able to load the VM Host machines up with large drives to act as a backup in case the SAN goes down.

Is this feasible? If so, how would you replicate the VMs to these servers (vision core software)? How would you get your VM to load on the local machines in the even of a SAN failure?
NTS_SupportAsked:
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jakethecatukCommented:
trying to replicate the data to one of your VM's isn't going to be an option for you.  because the vmdk (virtual machine disks) will be open, the data has to be replicated at a lower level than ESX.

In order to get the redundancy you need, you will have to replicate the data from the SAN to another equalogic SAN.

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NateWilliamsCommented:
No real time redundancy within ESX itself.  Using localized storage is definitely an option.  The only requirements is that you create a datastore on the localized storage and place your VM backups there.  That way, if it goes down, you can just add it to inventory and power on.  This is also assuming the backup software you are looking at can write to VMFS volumes.
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Malli BoppeCommented:
You can use SAN melody which is a SAN repliaction software.You don't need to buy another SAN.You can just buy a JBOD and attach it to low end server which would act as SAN with SAN melody installed.
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jakethecatukCommented:
[mboppe quote]You can just buy a JBOD and attach it to low end server which would act as SAN with SAN melody installed[/end quote]

mboppe - SAN Melody is a great product but it WILL NOT support continuous replication from the Equalogic 6000 (which is the SAN the OP has).  It will only offer that when you have a second licenced copy of SAN Melody.

NTS_Support - you asked another question (ID:25610122) and you stated '...We have lalmost no tolerance for SQL downtime. Currently, when we do windows updates on the cluster node1, we are able to flip to node2 before rebooting node1. Down time is less than 30 seconds...'.  If this is the case, then the only way you can protect your data with the same level of redundancy would be to buy an other Equalogic SAN and set up continuous replication between the two SAN's.

Any other solution will have to include an element of downtime and/or data loss.  

SQL Database mirroring could be an answer to your problems so please look at this Microsoft article: -
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc917680.aspx#XSLTsection130121120120
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CanalInsCommented:
You should be able to do what you are asking with Vizioncore vReplicator. Here's what I would do:

Create a VM to run vreplicator on both ESX hosts.

Have the vrep1 on ESX host1 replicate all of ESX host2's VM's to the local storage on host1 and vice versa.

That way you will have host2 replicates available on host 1 if neccessary and vice versa.

vReplicator will make these VMs show up on both servers, but not powered on on the backup. If a failure occurs you will just have to fire them up.

It works really well and vReplicator software is really easy to use. You will need to license 2 copies though.

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CanalInsCommented:
The accepted solution is not necessarily true. You can do replications without doing it from the SAN. I do it everyday. I have implemented this scenario multiple times.
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