Suggestions for installing ubuntu on a new laptop partition

I just set up a new unformatted partition on my laptop and was looking for suggestions on what would be the best way to install unbuntu linux from a hard drive (either the same machine or over the network). I already have a bootable usb stick that boots into a slimmed down version of linux (not sure which flavor) if that helps at all.
opikeAsked:
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opikeAuthor Commented:
For what it's worth... here's the output from a uname -a of the linux on the usb stick:

Linux PartedMagic 2.6.32.9-pmagic #3 SMP Fri Mar 12 15:53:22 CST 2020 i686 GNU/Linux
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TobiasHolmCommented:
Hi!

If you have access to a computer with internet access I think the easiest way would be to

1. Download UNetBootIn: http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/

2. Insert an empty USB-stick (at least 1GB in size)

2. Select Ubuntu 9.10_Live, select your USB-stick and click OK

3. Boot the computer you want to reinstall with Ubuntu from this USB-stick and install Ubuntu

If you don't want to install Ubuntu there are several other distributions you can select in UNetBootIn.

Regards, Tobias
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TobiasHolmCommented:
ops! Missed the numbering above... ;) Anyway, insert the USB-stick before starting UNetBootIn! :)

Regards, Tobias
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opikeAuthor Commented:
Ok - I used the UNetBootIn and installed ubuntu and it boots up and my old windows vista instance boots up... but I think somehow ubuntu and vista are installed in the same partition. I created a separate partition for ubuntu (size ~80GB) and formatted it as ext3 during the ubuntu install... but when I boot up ubuntu and look at the amount of disk space available to the OS it says 144GB which is the size of the vista partition.

One thing about the ubuntu install is that it doesn't have you explicitly state which partition you are installing into... I set up the one partition (sd3) as ext3 and I guess I just assumed it would put ubuntu into that partition as opposed to the existing ntfs partitions.

If ubuntu was installed into the 144gb ntfs partition, how do I remove it? And how do I direct the ubuntu installer to install into the 80gb ext3 partition?

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opikeAuthor Commented:
A df -k shows that it got installed in the correct partition (sda3).

Still don't know why the disk usage analyzer shows a the filesystem capacity for the ntfs partition (~144 gb). Oh well...
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TobiasHolmCommented:
;) ok, looks like you've got Ubuntu in the right place then!

If you had installed Ubuntu is the same partition as Vista and wanted to remove Ubuntu you could boot Vista and delete all Ubuntu-files/directories. And to get rid of Grub you could boot the Vista CD and repair MBR + boot.

Regards, Tobias
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