Identifying computer name of a logged on user

Is there a tool or command that would let me see the computer name(s) of all the computers that a given active directory domain user is logged on to?
tomsyrAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

SjoerdvWCommented:
Do you mean computers where the user is currently logged on to, or all computers where the user ever logged on to?
0
arnoldCommented:
Do you have a login script that registeres when a user logs in?
Adding %computername% to the login script will add the information you seek.
The other option is to process the security event logs on the DC's looking for Login/Logout events 538/528 and then extracting the information dealing with the workstation from which the attempt was made.
0
tomsyrAuthor Commented:
I am looking for the computer name that the user is currently logged on to.
In regards to the security logs, what if I have multiple DC's?
Does it log to each of them, or only the one that processed the request?
0
Cloud Class® Course: Python 3 Fundamentals

This course will teach participants about installing and configuring Python, syntax, importing, statements, types, strings, booleans, files, lists, tuples, comprehensions, functions, and classes.

SjoerdvWCommented:
Only the one that processed the logon show them in the security log. These logs are also pretty difficult to analyse.

You can take a look at the current sessions (in computer manager) to see the clients IP of the current sessions, but then also: this is only for the processing DC.

Do you have a file server holding the roaming profiles? You can take a look at the current sessions on this server....
0
abelenkiyCommented:
What is the reason you need this? Please explain the problem at hand and maybe we can think of an alternate solution besides tracking the user sessions.
0
tomsyrAuthor Commented:
One example is that if a user needs remote support, I can connect to them with remote desktop, vnc, proxy, etc. but in all cases, I will need either their IP or computer name. They can give that to me, but I would like to bypass having to ask them.
Another case would be a user logged into multiple PC's,and their password expiring.
What are the other PC's they are logged into.
0
arnoldCommented:
The user can request assistance (remote assistance) and send you the invitation via email. As long as you are on the same LAN or the two have a LAN to LAN VPN you should be able to connect and handle the other's session.
The other way is to use a login script that adds information to a central file
i.e. the login script:
@echo off
echo "User: %USERNAME% logged in on %COMPUTERNAME% at %DATE% %TIME% using sessiontype: %sessionname%" >> \\sharedservers\share\allaccessfile_write

A similar thing can be created for the logoff script.

You could configure a event log forwarding to a single system where you still would need to process the log.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb427443%28VS.85%29.aspx
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
tomsyrAuthor Commented:
I was looking to avoid using a login script to accomplish this, but in the end, that will accomplish what I need.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Microsoft Legacy OS

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.