scared of APC Smartup 3000

The other day I scared myself. I have server rack with a Smart RT5000 system model SURT5000XLT it includes three APC Smart-UPS RT 192V batteries and a second rack that has a basic rack PDU outlet in it. On the first rack I have 5 servers in it so it's full. On the second rack I have two Quantum Snap servers, firewall and router. On this second rack I went to add a Windows XP PC to it the other day it's a Micron PC PIII that runs a software called RouterScan for an old copier/scanner machine. Anyway when I plugged it into the PDU it popped and killed the power supply. I looked at the power supply which is about 9 years old and it has this switch that can be set to 115V or 230V. looking at all my servers and appliances that are pludded into these racks, only the firewall and the two Snap servers say on them 100-240V next to the power inlets the rest of the servers say nothing. I called my APC vendor and they said that the old Micron PC will not work on that battery. They also claim that I should power supply and if the powers supply has these setting from 110 ro 230V to try the 230V. QUESTION, I'm not plugging nothing in that says 110v or 230v periop. Nowon another rack (diff. site) I have a server rack with a APC Smartup 3000 should I be concern about this? can I plug any computer into it? here are the specs: http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=su3000net

thanks  
LVL 1
jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

DavidPresidentCommented:
You sound out of your element. I would hire an electrician for a few hundred dollars.
0
jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
Wow,
many typos on my post, sorry about that. To clerifiy. I have a APC Smartup 3000, specs:
http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=su3000net

Question: If I'm going to plug in an appliance/computer and the power supply on it has a setting of 115v or 230v do I need to switch it to 230v? I know that the setting 115v works fine on a wall outlet. I also now that if the appliance/computer shows a setting call out on the power supply 100-240v it should work just fine.
0
DavidPresidentCommented:
It depends on the equipment you are plugging in.  Some people run racks with 220, others with 110. 220VAC is more efficient and will lower electric bills.  Also if a device requires high current then more likely it only accepts 220 anyway.

But you risk frying something if it is set for 110 (115/120, but you get the idea) volts input and you give it the 220.   You need to read the label to see if it is autoswitching for input voltage, or has a switch that goes between 110/220 .. or if it just only accepts 110.

0
Powerful Yet Easy-to-Use Network Monitoring

Identify excessive bandwidth utilization or unexpected application traffic with SolarWinds Bandwidth Analyzer Pack.

DavidPresidentCommented:
If you decide to introduce 220 anywhere, then make darned sure you label things.  Some people get 220VAC stickers and place them over unused power strip plugs to idiot proof it ... but the argument is that if anybody actually has to worry about somebody not checking input voltage, then that person doesn't belong in a datacenter anyway.

0
jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
Thanks dlethe
0
aleghartCommented:
The spec page you listed (SmartUPS 3000VA) is for an UPS that is 120VAC input with 120VAC output.

Short answer, you should always check the PSU input requirements and verify the output of your UPS or mains meets the requirements.

An NEMA 5-15R outlet (looks like a standard 15A 120V wall plug) shouldn't be putting out anything other than 120V +/-.  I can't imagine how or why anyone would do differently.

For 240V output, you'd be using an L6-20R or -30R, which are twist-lock receptacles for 20A and 30A.  6-20 and 6-30 have straight blades, but are not as common as the twist-lock variets

Alternatively, you could see an IEC 320 receptacle, which is five-sided molded plastic and looks the the AC input side of your computer's PSU.  You'd use a power cable that was IEC320 at both ends (plug/connector).  These can be used for 120 or 240 power.

With NEMA, x5-xx is 3-prong grounded for 120V.  x6-xx is 3-blade grounded for 240V.  1-xx is older 2-prong polarized, with no ground.
 
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
DavidPresidentCommented:
All UPS's fail.  You fried something.  At very least go to radio shack and invest in a $20 voltage meter.  But rule of thumb, if something gets fried after connecting to a UPS, you need to call in a professional. Your other equipment is worth more than what it would cost to bring in an electrician.
0
aleghartCommented:
dlethe,
I think the OP's PSU fried.  Not a failure of a 5kVA UPS.  That UPS is 208VAC output with the ability to step down to 110VAC with a transformer.

If he plugged in his PSU to a "220" receptacle and did not manually switch his PSU to 220/240, then when it fried, it was PAD...performing as designed.  Nothing wrong with that.  It's an operator malfunction, not the failure of an UPS.
0
DavidPresidentCommented:
Agreed, higher probability of a simple PSU failure .. but by the nature of the question & followups, and the fear-factor, AND use of 2 racks and all that equipment, then user could very well be drawing more current than the UPS could supply,  hence the electrician.  
0
jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
User error,
I'm not convinced it's any equipment. If the power supply is not an auto switch system then I the user should set the setting properly. No need for an electrician
0
jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
thanks
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Components

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.