ps tdiskio field is empty on AIX

I have issue with field tdiskio for ps command on my AIX
# oslevel -s
5300-06-01-0000
, it's empty for each  process:
ps -e -o pid=,tdiskio= | head -5
       1       -
   94352       -
  114780       -
  118890       -
  131176       -

How I can turn system to catch real values of this field ?

Thank you.
jgb26Asked:
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woolmilkporcCommented:
chdev -l sys0 -a iostat=true

wmp
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jgb26Author Commented:
Thanks a lot.
I change the iostat to true:
# lsattr -El sys0 |grep iostat
iostat          true               Continuously maintain DISK I/O history            True

but when I run :
ps -e -o pid=,tdiskio= | head -5
I am still seeing a hyphen (-)  for tdiskio. Should  I restart the server or wait some time before it works ?

Thanks
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jgb26Author Commented:
Do you think that this has something to do with the WLM ( Work Load Manager) configuration ? Should I configure WLM and create classes for the processes in order to be able to monitor the Disk I/O ?

Thanks
0
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jgb26Author Commented:
I am able to run nmon but I would like to have Disk I/O for on specific process.
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Hi again,

iostat=true is important for the iostat and nmon commands to work correctly.

But obviously the tdiskio field of ps is not used by AIX, and I'm not aware of any way to make it work.

WLM has no influence on this, I checked it.

Sorry, no better news!

wmp
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jgb26Author Commented:
Thanks for your answer woolmilkporc.

I started WLM using smitty wlm and after a few minutes I was able to see tdiskio:

# ps -efo pid,tdiskio,class,args|pg
   PID TDISKIO CLASS        COMMAND
     1       0 System       /etc/init
102488       0 System       /usr/dt/bin/dtlogin -daemon
110698      24 System       /usr/lib/errdemon
123042   88776 System       /usr/sbin/syncd 60
127046   28640 System       /usr/ccs/bin/shlap64
139414     608 Default      /opt/IBM/ldap/V6.1/sbin/64/ibmdiradm -I tdsinst
143466     216 System       /usr/sbin/syslogd
155860   20984 System       /opt/IBM/tdsdb2V9.1/bin/db2fmcd
159908     268 System       /usr/sbin/rsct/bin/IBM.ServiceRMd
172092       0 System       db2ckpwd 0
176380     148 System       ./mflm_manager
180302     616 System       /usr/sbin/rsct/bin/IBM.AuditRMd
188538    1916 System       /usr/bin/xmwlm -L

my  problem is that I had to start WLM . I would like to get this same information without starting WLM. Do you have any suggestions ?

thanks again
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woolmilkporcCommented:
OK,

you're right regarding WLM.

The reason why I didn't see this before is that in my WLM setup the total resource limits are disabled,
which obviously leads to tdiskio not being needed and thus not being filled.

And No, I don't have any idea how to get tdiskio values without using WLM and its total resource limit checking.

wmp




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jgb26Author Commented:
Thank you
0
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