pspice error

I always get the following error when trying to do a bias point simulation

ERROR -- Voltage source and/or inductor loop involving X_F1.VF_F1
You may break the loop by adding a series resistance  


the circuit is below... why is that?

pspice.JPG
thevenin.JPG
kuntilanakAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

d-glitchCommented:
I'm not sure how you dependent sources work, but I think the sense current
should actually flow through the input sense termingal.

You might try deleting the short wire above the V3 source.

The wire should go from the left side of R6 to the top input of F1,
then from the bottom input of F1 to the top of V3.

The gain of F1 should be beta, probably somewhere between 50 and 100.
0
kuntilanakAuthor Commented:
does this circuit seems to be right
cap.JPG
0
d-glitchCommented:
No.  My mistake.

>>  The wire should go from the RIGHT side of R6 to the top input of F1,
       then from the bottom input of F1 to the top of V3.
0
What were the top attacks of Q1 2018?

The Threat Lab team analyzes data from WatchGuard’s Firebox Feed, internal and partner threat intelligence, and a research honeynet, to provide insightful analysis about the top threats on the Internet. Check out our Q1 2018 report for smart, practical security advice today!

kuntilanakAuthor Commented:
what is the difference between that and my original circuit?
0
d-glitchCommented:
On second look, you values are correct.

That is the way to connect the dependent source.
I am not familiar with this version of PSpice.
0
kuntilanakAuthor Commented:
so what I am doing is correct on the first one, it just that you don't know what's wrong ?
0
d-glitchCommented:
In the first one, you are trying to look at the current in a short circuit (just a piece of wire).
You could  have put a 1 ohm (or 1 milliohm) resistor there, and things would have worked out.

This is what I meant by my fist post.  Treating the input to the dependent source like a current meter.

But you last circuit seems to be correct.
pspice-1A.JPG
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
kuntilanakAuthor Commented:
oh...that's what you mean... so here is what I got doing the simulation with what you have there

what does it mean when they say to:

short a-b and run a BIAS POINT simulation to find the short-ckt current iSC

what does short a-b mean
cap.JPG
0
d-glitchCommented:
My circuit is not correct.  

Your last circuit (with 307 uA for IB) is the way to go.

Look back up to the second picture in this post to see where (a) and (b) are.

To short out a and b, means to connect a  V=0 voltage source or a small resistor (1 ohm or 1 milliohm)
between these points and see what the current is.

You may have noticed that one of your questions from yesterday was deleted because the moderators
thought I was giving you too much help.  I don't think they read the question that closely.
But that's the way it goes.
0
kuntilanakAuthor Commented:
so the circuit here:

ID: 29466537

is the correct one?

just clarifying
0
d-glitchCommented:
Yes.  That looks correct.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Math / Science

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.