2 Networks 1 Desktop

I am trying to figure out how to get a desktop with 2 NICs (1 wired, 1 wireless) to connect to two different networks. I thought it would be as simple as adding a second NIC for the other network, but that doesnt seem to work. When I try to access resources from the 2nd network I guess the computer doesnt know which connection to use and it defaults to the wired network.

Is there a way to setup an XP desktop to access resources on two seperate networks using two NICs?
BIZNETplusAsked:
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theras2000Commented:
It should work.  Do the networks have different IP ranges?  Have you tried pining computers on both networks?  Could you give us a 'route print' screenshot (open a command prompt and type that in) and tell us which network is which, and an example of an IP you can't reach.
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houssam_balloutCommented:
are you able to get IP from the second network card?
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BIZNETplusAuthor Commented:
Yes, it was able to pull correct IP address from 2nd network.

No, I was not able to ping succesfully ping resources on 2nd network (without removing calbe from 1st NIC)

The networks are totally different IP subnets:

Net 1: 192.168.1.*

Net 2: 192.168.111.*
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B HCommented:
did you try pinging ip addresses on both networks, or computer names?

you might need to adjust the properties on both network controllers, to allow netbios - if you want computer names to work on the network

control panel > network > right click an adapter, properties, tcp/ip, properties, advanced, WINS tab, put the dot by 'enable netbios over tcp', hit ok a few times

-repeat for the other nic

the machines on the networks, have you configured the windows firewall on those machines to allow you to connect to them?

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JuamezCommented:
Can you go to the command prompt and post the output of this command?

route print

You'll see that the there are default routes specified (0.0.0.0 with mask 0.0.0.0) which are guided over the wired network with a metric of 20 opposed to the metric of 25 for the wireless network, so the wired connection gets prioritized over the equivalent wireless entry. If you need to address certain IP-ranges through the wireless network, you need to add a route to that range to your route-table, specifying the wireless NIC as the interface with the highest priority.

For example, when you want to add the route for IP range 192.168.1.0/24 to go via the WiFi connection, you need to enter this line in the command prompt:

route add 192.168.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0 192.168.1.1 metric 19 if 0x2

Where the first IP is the range, further specified by the mask, then followed by the gateway (which is the default gateway for your WiFi connection), followed by a metric which is used to prioritize equivalent entries in the route table, and finally coupled to an Interface, which is addressed by a number which you can see when you previously entered "route print" in the command prompt, above the route table.
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JuamezCommented:
There is a problem with this approach though, because the route table entries coupled to a certain interface get erased whenever that interface gets disabled or unplugged, so then you have to add the entry to the route table again manually.

You can always make a script which contains the line which adds the right entry to the route table, but the problem there is that the number of the interfaces change from time to time, so you'll have to write a piece of script first that finds the number of the interface using the output of the "route print" command followed by some trimming of the output, and using that as a parameter to call the script to add the route to the route table. Sounds complicated, but it's textbook pragmatic scripting stuff.
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BIZNETplusAuthor Commented:
Juamez

What you are saying makes sense as far as the wired connection is by default higher priority than the wireless connection. This is certainly my experience. I will try this solution as soon as I get back on site.
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BIZNETplusAuthor Commented:
oops, just saw your second post there. Perhaps I wont be trying this solution. That scripting is a bit over my head.

Any other possible routes anyone can think of?
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greg wardSystems EngineerCommented:
use route add -p for a persistent route
 
Greg
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BIZNETplusAuthor Commented:
Well adding an argument does seem much easier than writing that figuring out all the scripting.

Does the -p go right after the "route add" command or at the end of the line?

Also, the -p argument wasn't added later than XP was it?
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JuamezCommented:
Oh yeah, I forgot about that persistence option. That may solve your problem. Thanks for pointing that out, deepdraw.
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JuamezCommented:
I know I'm littering the thread somewhat with all my double posts, but I hit enter too soon before reading the last question properly:

The -p goes behind route and before add, according to the help output of the route command.
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AnnOminousCommented:
Unless you have a single DNS server that can serve both networks, you will have problems.
Subnet routing is one issue.
Default routing is another.
And getting DNS to respond correctly for each subnet is another that will be hard to resolve.

It's not impossible, but there have to be easier ways to achieve what you are trying to do.
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greg wardSystems EngineerCommented:
They way i have done this in the past is to set up a main network and a second network.
set up one card as normal and the second card just give an ip and subnet mask.
any extra networks the second network card can reech have to be added by using the route add command.
 
Greg
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greg wardSystems EngineerCommented:
@AnnOminous I have never been able to set up a second dns server on windows xp is it even possible?
 
Greg
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OOsorioCommented:
If these were 2 wired NIC's you would not have any problem. Some wireless NIC's disable all other network interfaces. Read the documentation for the wireless NIC, most probably it is disabling the wired NIC.
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naykamCommented:
Have you seen http://www.r1ch.net/stuff/forcebindip/

this may be helpful for your situation
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