DNS scavenging records of servers still in use

My DNS server just scavenged a boat load of server IPs for servers still in use.  Any suggestions??!
pgetchellAsked:
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Paul MacDonaldConnect With a Mentor Director, Information SystemsCommented:
I think I'd leave things as they were and ascribe the problem to a ghost in the machine.  If the problem recurs, maybe you can gather more detailed troubleshooting information to help pinpoint the problem.  If the problem doesn't recur, well, no worries, right?
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
Are the server IPs dynamically assigned?  If so, they'd have been flagged to be deleted when the DNS record became stale.  If not, they shouldn't have been scavenged in the first place.
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pgetchellAuthor Commented:
No, they're static IPs.  And they're IPs for servers that have been online for sometime now...months and in some cases some of the servers that were scavenged are a few years old.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
Heh.  Well it shouldn't work that way.  How do you know DNS scavenging is what removed the records?  Is it possible someone else is playing in your park?
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pgetchellAuthor Commented:
I agree it shouldn't work like that...it never has.  I don't think they were manually removed because my secondary DNS server initiated a scavenge today @ 2:30 PM...at which time the poop hit the fan.  Believe me, I'm stumped.  I've never seen anything like this where I lost the IPs of @ 10 servers that are still in use
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
Is it possible that someone edited the properties of the NICs and removed the check mark for "Register this connection's settings in DNS"?  If that happened, then the servers would no longer dynamically register their IPs in DNS and then they would become stale and get scavenged the next time scavenging was run. Or, another thought - could someone have stopped the DHCP client service on these servers? That would also have the same effect.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
Any chance there's something useful in the DNS or Event logs?
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pgetchellAuthor Commented:
Thanks Hypercat. The NICs are still set to "register their connections with DNS" and the DHCP Client service is still running.  What's very odd is that all of these servers have been online and part of our enterprise in some cases for years.

Event logs look good.  I see an entry for a successful scavenging of the database on Weds 4/7/2010 at 2:45PM which was when I lost my IPs LOL!

Do you folks know if there is any caveat to me simply turning off automatic scavenging?  If it just means I have to manually purge old IPs, then nthat's fine. Wondering if automatic scavenging can be turned off entirely.

Thanks for all the help!
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
Yes, you can turn off scavenging - right-click on the server and 'Set Aging/Scavenging For All Zones...'
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pgetchellAuthor Commented:
My only fear with turning scavenging off would be if it'd result in a negative impact on DHCP clients.  It'd be nice to buffer my static IP servers fronm scavenging,  byut the DHCP IPs would be nice to have purged when no longer in use.  You see my catch 22?

Thanks paulmacd for all your help.
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pgetchellAuthor Commented:
Good point Paulmacd.  I've been working here for 13+ yeasrs...10+ on the network, and never saw this before (from time to time it'd happen to 1 server here or there, but nothing like yesterday).

I'm going to continue to read/ investigate and will keep this post open for the time being and welcome any other feedback.
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Hypercat (Deb)Commented:
I would concur with Paulmacd also. But as to turning off the scavenging, it wouldn't have a negative impact except if you have a lot of workstations or servers that are periodically offline for longer than your scavenging period, and then get put back on the network. Normally, workstations that are consistently connected to the network will always get the same IP address every time they renew, so those DNS entries would never be scavenged anyway.
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pgetchellAuthor Commented:
I resolved the issue by writing a DNS-record re-registration script and installing it on the servers in question.
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