Extreme Networks UDP Profiles on a Summit X450a

I am trying to setup a new profile for UDP on an Extreme switch. The model is a x450a running version 12.x XOS. I retreived the example below from their command reference. It doesn't really have any information for setting up a profile for 2 DHCP servers and also multiple VLAN's.

It also states some information about more than 8 VLAN's which we have about 25. Do I create a 1 to 1 ratio or possibly lump 8 VLAN's into each profile? Here's what it says about more than 8 VLAN's.

"You can have two valid set statements in each entry of a UDP forwarding policy; one a destinationipaddress and one a VLAN. ExtremeXOS currently allows a maximum of eight entries in a UDP forwarding policy, so you can define a maximum of sixteen destinations for one inbound broadcast UDP packet: eight IP addresses and eight VLANs."

Any help in setting up a profile for two DHCP servers and 25 VLAN's would be great. Thank you.

entry one {
if match all {
destination-port 67 ;
} then {
destination-ipaddress 20.0.0.5 ;
}
}

entry two {
if match all {
destination-port 67 ;
} then {
vlan "to7" ;
}
}
MCSFAsked:
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from_expCommented:
what is more important here is what do you want to do? please define your task and we'll try to create policy together.
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MCSFAuthor Commented:
Hi Exp, sorry, what I am trying to do is setup a profile on an Extreme switch for DHCP. It's basically a wheel and spoke setup. We have layer 2 switches that come back to a core switch that is running layer 3. The "workgroup" switches have the users that will be going back to the core and the getting on another VLAN that contains the DHCP servers.

We have about 25 VLAN's that will be getting IP's from two different DHCP servers. What I was looking to do is write a policy that will have two DHCP servers and the max number of VLAN's the profile can handle without degrading performance. If it's 8 VLAN's then I would add 8 and create 4 profiles. If it's better to write a profile for each VLAN then I would do that. One part I am not sure on is adding multiple DHCP servers to the profile.

then {
destination-ipaddress 20.0.0.5 ;
destination-ipaddress 20.0.0.6 ;
}

If it tries one and then the other or does it ignore all except the last one. Does that make sense?
0
from_expCommented:
why do you do not want to use dhcp relay for each vlan?
enable bootrelay vr <vrid>
configure bootrelay add <ip address> vr <vrid>
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MCSFAuthor Commented:
Sorry I am not an expert and probably missing it. I thought you had to use the profile, as well as, turning on bootprelay.

I have something like this but several VLAN's going into the layer 3 switch.

Layer 2 VLAN1 (x450E | client is here) ---------> Layer 3 switch (x450A) <-------------- Layer 2 VLAN2 (x450E | DHCP Server is here)

The only VR's I see is the "VR-Default" and the "VR-Mgmt".

I did turn on the bootprelay with the command "configure bootprelay add 10.x.x.1" and then I added a second DHCP server with the same command "configure bootprelay add 10.x.x.2". Then I thought you had to create a profile and tie it to a VLAN to work.

I take it I am looking at it all wrong? I was just using the the command reference. I don't quite understand the VR's. I never use vr-defaut and only use vr-mgmt with a temp IP when I upgrade the firmware or need to load a config or something with the download or tftp command.

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from_expCommented:
you need only bootprelay commands

policy you need only for generic udp broadcast forwarding, when bootprelay is not used

take a look here:
http://www.extremenetworks.com/libraries/services/ExtremeXOSConceptsGuideSoftwareVersion12_4_rev1.zip
page 1182
the only requirement here is that your switch has to have an access to that vlan2 with dhcp server. if it does, then it will be able to successfully forward dhcp requests from clients
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MCSFAuthor Commented:
Ok, that sounds great. I have both the command reference and concepts that I just peeked at the page you specified but I was completely looking in the wrong place. May I ask one more question. When do you use a profile? Like when the DHCP server and clients needing an IP are more than one hop away? I don't quite understand some good examples of when to use a profile and when you don't need to.
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from_expCommented:
as for my understanding, udp profiles are used, when you want to interconnect two udp broadcast domains.
in case of DHCP relaying bootprelay is more convenient way to do the job.
most likely if you take a look at policy usage after bootprelay and dhcp relaying configured via profiles you'll see the same figures.
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MCSFAuthor Commented:
Thank you for all the help. I really appreciate it! :)
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