Cisco Router Network Configuration on same network

Hi.
I have a client who is utilzing the same phsysical address, but is going to move some computers (and servers) to an off-site location. Currently, the entire office is on a class C network....
192.168.0.1/24.

Doing so, they are going to implement a T-1 (not point to point) where as the office will need to 'route' traffic between both offices so as both offices can access the computers on either network.

So, my questions are:

1) Is it possible for a router to force traffic on the same network to either office (essentialy, not routing the traffic - but - passing the packets between both offices) The reason I ask this is that I am trying to avoid having to either subnet or create a totally seperate network at one of the offices to allow the traffic to pass between the two.

i.e.

office 1
192.168.0.2/24

to router1
to router2

office two
192.168.0.3/24

2) The second question I think depends on the above answer. What router would you recommend for the above and if I CANT actually 'route' the traffic due to the network configuration of both offices being on the same network, what add-ons should I purchase for the IOS?

Please let me know if you need any additional information.

Bob

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NotSoKlearAsked:
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that1guy15Commented:
its not a good idea to have the same subnet span multiple locations. The reason for this is your router and network devices will have issue determining were to route traffic since the same subnet exist in two locations.

Good design is to have a separate subnet for each location. So site A will be 192.168.0.0 and site 2 use 192.168.10.0.

Im guessing since this is not a P2P link that you will want secure communication between the two locations since the traffic will pass the internet. So you will need to setup a VPN.

For a small/Medium business i would suggest using the SonicWall VPN appliance for internet access and multi-site communication.

The sonicwall will provide a solid all in one solution to cover your firewall, VPN and routing needs between locations. Plus they also support several other good security features. Sonicwall also has a simple WebGUI for setup and configuration.

IF not sonicwall then look at Cisco ASA or Juniper SSG. both are great firewalls and will get the job done
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NotSoKlearAuthor Commented:
Well, it I think I may have mis-spoke. The P2P isnt a direct connect (via layer 2).... Its a leased line going into a cloud. The need for the routing comes from that very fact.... that there will be two external IP addresses (Office 1 - external and then Office 2 - external). Say 66.5.2.1 to 66.4.2.1.

So, I guess what your saying (this a question) is that i am going to need to re-ip office 1, placing a route statement where any traffic that needs to goto office 2 (and vice-versa) will go through either respective route statement? There is also going to be a seperate DSL for internet access.... so, ill need a default route to send any traffic not on either of those networks to the gateway for the Internet... correct?

Assuming the above statements I made are correct (eg not requiring a VPN) should I just use a router to accomplish the task?

Thanks for your time.

Bob
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NotSoKlearAuthor Commented:
Also, when you mentioned above 'A different subnet' would it be possible/adviseable to use /25 and split the network into two segments via subnetting?

192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.126 /25 - Office 1

and

192.168.1.127 - 254 /25 - Office 2

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RunningGagCommented:
You are still going to need a VPN to make sure your traffic between offices is secure.  Data traveling through the Internet can take all kinds of paths, you don't want your data traveling insecurely.

You can use a Cisco router to accomplish what you want, but a firewall type device such as a Cisco ASA is a better solution.  If you choose to go with a Cisco router, make sure you look at hardening it on the public side.

You can use a /25, but Its usually recommended to leave lots of room just in case you need it.
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Istvan KalmarHead of IT Security Division Commented:
Hi,

I advise to separate the subnets, if it isn't working you able to configure L2TPV3, it is working with Cisco 1841
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that1guy15Commented:
"So, I guess what your saying (this a question) is that i am going to  need to re-ip office 1, placing a route statement where any traffic that  needs to goto office 2 (and vice-versa) will go through either  respective route statement?"

correct

"There is also going to be a separate DSL for internet access.... so, ill  need a default route to send any traffic not on either of those  networks to the gateway for the Internet... correct?"

correct. you will point traffic to the public ip on the DSL router and then NAT the traffic to your private networks

"Assuming the above statements I made are correct (eg not requiring a  VPN) should I just use a router to accomplish the task?"

yeah with separate subnets you will just place a route to the other sites subnet in your router pointing all traffic to this site to the sites public IP. Just as everyone else is suggesting you really need to be using a VPN. I would not trust any data traversing the net without a VPN in place. Most business class routers along with firewalls that can handle your router can establish a VPN. Check out the Cisco ASA, SonicWall and Juniper SSG. SonicWall would be my choice for SMB.

"Also, when you mentioned above 'A different subnet' would it be  possible/advisable to use /25 and split the network into two segments  via subnetting?"

yeah it is possible as long as the subnet range is big enough for all your devices. Also keep in mind growth. I personally would suggest assigning several /24s to each site in case you do start to grow. So site A gets 192.168.0.x/24 - 192.168.7.0/24 and site B give 192.168.8.x/24 - .15.x/24. You dont have to configure them just dedicate those subnets to each site. this gives plenty of room for growth.


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NotSoKlearAuthor Commented:
What are the drawbacks of l2tpv3 if any?
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