Preparing a new hd on tablet

I've bought a couple of years ago a tablet pc.
It came originally with a hd of 40gb. I bought a ew hd 100gb (ide both).
The original hd came with a software inside it somewhere that can do recovery and reinstall the windows xp. I've formated the 100gb, and now would like to create a windows xp on the 100gb. The problem is that the recovery is valid only on boot time. I managed to see both disks on the windows xp and a usb port that is connected to the 100gb hd. there isn't a way connecting both disks inside the tablet, that is why I used the usb port to see the new 100gb hd.

When I browse the 40gb disk I see only the windows xp that is installed in it... not the recovery files (or windows xp installation).

How can I copy the recovery files to the 100gb hd using windows xp?
amitbuenoAsked:
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Jackie ManConnect With a Mentor Commented:
According to the advice of kresozg, try the fix below.
"(copy-paste solution from - http://www.devhardware.com/forums/software-27/norton-ghost-problems-82618.html )
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I had exactly this problem, and managed to fix it - eventually. The fix is easy, and I find it amazing that Symantec don't suggest it.

My situation: upgrading a C: drive to a larger HDD (second-hand and already formatted) using Norton Ghost9. Disk Copy appears to work, but there is no WinXP login screen when you boot with the new drive. (In Win2k, the same problem occurs, except that you get a message about a missing Page file when you try to log in).

The reason this happens, is because of the way Windows assigns drive letters, and is also able to uniquely identify each HDD. When you copy the drive, you are probably copying from C: to E: (for example). This drive letter is held in the Registry. It overrides whatever drive letter is assigned by DOS.

When you reboot from the new drive (which was previously E:, but looks like C: in DOS), part-way through the process Windows recognises the HDD listed in the Registry, and sees that it has been assigned the letter E:. So it changes it from C: to E:! No more C: drive, and no login possible.

This is what worked for me, with the target drive formatted NTFS and mounted as E:
1. Start Ghost 9 (don't copy the drive yet)
2. Start RegEdit and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SYSTEM/MountedDevices
3. Swap the key names for \DosDevices\C: and \DosDevices\E:
(you'll have to change C: to T:, E: to C: and T: to E: for example, to avoid duplicating the name).
This modifies the live Registry on disk, ready to be copied.
It doesn't upset your running PC, because the Windows drive assignment is only read when Windows boots.
4. Run the Disk Copy (use both Set Drive Active and Copy MBR flags) and let it complete.
Your "fixed" registry is now on the new disk.
5. Now swap the above key names again, back the way they started out, to restore the registry on the old disk.
6. Quit RegEdit, Quit Ghost, swap the HDD connections and reboot.

If it works for you like it did for me, the new drive will boot perfectly and is still assigned the letter C: which is almost certainly what you want. All programs work just like they did before.

You still have your old drive as backup - it hasn't changed.

You might want to back up your registry before you edit it - but these edits are very straight-forward. The biggest risk is a power cut while the Registry is in its modified state and the DiskCopy is only half complete. Borrow a UPS if you're nervous!

I realize jadeddog solved the problem by other means, but maybe this will be of help to somebody else looking to fix the same problem."
Source: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Misc/Q_22074177.html
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atomsheepCommented:
If your original HDD had a hidden recovery partition, then you might need to clone the disk over to the new HDD and then disconnect the old disk and connect the new one (internally), and then use the recovery software (or recovery DVD, etc) to reinstall Windows afresh.

EASEUS Disk Copy (http://www.easeus.com/disk-copy/) sounds like a good method to clone the disk. Also read http://www.easeus.com/disk-copy/help/upgrading-hard-disks.htm
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amitbuenoAuthor Commented:
Sounds like a reasonable solution,. the problem is that I can not boot using that EASEUS CD ISO because I do not have a cd/dvd in the tablet...
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nobusCommented:
you'll have to connect BOTH disks to a working pC for doing that.
perrsonally i use Acronis True image for that :  www.acronis.com
but there are free ones around too : http://www.runtime.org/driveimage-xml.htm
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atomsheepCommented:
The easiest solution is what nobus mentioned - hook both of the disks up to another computer and use cloning software (e.g. EASESUS Disk Copy, DriveImage XML, etc).

Another method is to make a bootable USB flash drive which has the cloning software on it, and then boot into that and then clone the disk. CloneZilla is a popular free disk cloner which can be put onto a bootable USB - instructions are here (http://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live/liveusb.php).
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amitbuenoAuthor Commented:
I've used the Norton Ghost Disk Copy.
But Now the new 100gb hd,. loads the windows xp... and after the logo where it suppose to write 'welcome' it halts on a small windows xp logo..

What to do?
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amitbuenoAuthor Commented:
does the logon process of windows xp creates a text .log file?
I am trying to figure out what makes it halt while loading the xp... do you think it suppose to do with the differentiation of the hd sizes. Or what did I miss on that process...
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nobusCommented:
disk sizes don't matter - but it looks like the clone was not correct...
please retry !
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Jackie ManCommented:
Agreed.
The simplest way is to buy Acronis True Image Home 2010, install it in Windows XP. Then, do a disk-to-disk from your local 40Gb hard disk to the 100Gb new hard disk connected via usb port.
After the disk-to-disk clone,. replace the 40Gb hard disk with 100Gb hard disk and all you will NOT need to copy any files or re-install any applications.
To play safe, do a hard disk Diagnosis od your 40Gb old hard disk before starting the disk-to-disk cloning process.
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Jackie ManCommented:
Format the 100Gb hard disk and try Acronis True Image Home 2010. It will work for almost every case.
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amitbuenoAuthor Commented:
Don't you think that the Norton Disk Copy did the same task as that program?

BTW: I've recopied the disks with Norton, still same result, windows xp on the 100gb, loads and get halted on the welcome screen...
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Jackie ManCommented:
In my opinion, Norton Disk Copy is very different from Acronis True Image as you need to connect the new 100Gb hard disk as a secondary hard disk in your computer via IDE controller. For a desktop, it is easy to do. But, for a notebook, it is not possible unless your notebook is an IBM ThinkPad where HDD modular bay drive is available as an option.
For details of how cloning in Acronis True Image Home 2010 works, please read pages 159 to 164 of the PDF manual in the link below.
http://download.acronis.com/pdf/TrueImage2010_UserGuide.en_eu.pdf 
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amitbuenoAuthor Commented:
I managed to do the copy with the Norton.
I connected the working boot disk 40gb, to the base of the tablet,. and the second was connected via usb cable and was enabled by wndows x as a second drive, then I ran the norton disk copy and copied the files...

I still think the best way for me to check what is wrong with it is to check some log that the windows generate while loading and halting on the 'welcome' screen.
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amitbuenoAuthor Commented:
the problem is of course that I do not know whether such a log file (text log file) exists in the windows configuration... need help on that one from you...
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amitbuenoAuthor Commented:
Well explained, worked on the first time after disk copy.
Solved the issue well...

Thanks
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Jackie ManCommented:
Glad to know that you have the problem fixed. Cheers!
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