Does typing skill help reduce mistakes when working at command line (eg Unix) & emails in NOC operation


I'm trying to get some survey / feedbacks :

If there's occasional oversights made by computer operators working on rotating shifts,
esp when a number of typing (sending / replying emails, compilation of duties / job logs,
and Unix command-line operations) tasks are involved, would it help if they pick up typing.

Q1:
I thought if they are equipped with typing skills (like those of secretaries who type fast
with all 10 fingers), it would help focus better when typing is second nature to them.
Agree or Disagree?

Q2:
I just felt if a person has to keep looking at keyboard frequently, it would drain and strain
 the person that it compromises a computer operator to an extent.  Agree or disagree?


Some of the mistakes / shortcomings could be :
a) sending email to the wrong persons or missed certain people from email distributions
b) typing the command wrongly (eg: "tar cvf target.tar source" was mistyped as
     "tar cvf source.tar target"
c) even to the extent of copy & paste wrongly (though this is more of mouse action
    than keyboard action but I thought the lack of typing skill distracted the person to
    this extent
d) loss of productivity (delay in responding to emails & taking longer to prepare jobs
    or duties summary for the day / shift he has done which has more chance of
    being incomplete / inaccurate)

Trying to justify for computer operators to be equipped with typing skills
sunhuxAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Hilal1924Commented:
I thought if they are equipped with typing skills (like those of secretaries who type fast
with all 10 fingers), it would help focus better when typing is second nature to them.
Agree or Disagree?
 ==> Agreed

I just felt if a person has to keep looking at keyboard frequently, it would drain and strain
 the person that it compromises a computer operator to an extent.  Agree or disagree?
==> Agreed

Hilal

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
AmolCommented:
Q1:
I thought if they are equipped with typing skills (like those of secretaries who type fast with all 10 fingers), it would help focus better when typing is second nature to them.

---Agree/Disagree. At one point you to say to type fast and other point you say to not to do mistake. Actually here how you concentrate on your work that matters. Typing speed will just help to speed up the process but the person has to ensure what he is typing is correct or not.

Q2:
I just felt if a person has to keep looking at keyboard frequently, it would drain and strain the person that it compromises a computer operator to an extent.  Agree or disagree?

---Disagree. Here the problem is just that the work will be complete at slower speed but again depends on the person how he concentrate on the work. Mostly technical work don't require any typing speed. It is the accuracy that will matter.
arnoldCommented:
You seem to be concentrating on speed versus the skills.
Are you looking for someone to transcribe your instructions or someone who will solve issues as they come up and generate appropriate notices?

Could these tasks be automated i.e. an event occurs, generate an email to group A.
Your Guide to Achieving IT Business Success

The IT Service Excellence Tool Kit has best practices to keep your clients happy and business booming. Inside, you’ll find everything you need to increase client satisfaction and retention, become more competitive, and increase your overall success.

sunhuxAuthor Commented:
My replies are preceded by * below :


Q1:
---Agree/Disagree. At one point you to say to type fast and other point you say to not to do mistake. Actually here how you concentrate on your work that matters. Typing speed will just help to speed up the process but the person has to ensure what he is typing is correct or not.


Q2:
---Disagree. Here the problem is just that the work will be complete at slower speed but again depends on the person how he concentrate on the work. Mostly technical work don't require any typing speed. It is the accuracy that will matter.


* In response to the above two remarks,   Well, a trained typist looks at the screen almost al
* the time while he/she types, so mistakes are spotted immediately and the accuracy/comfort
* of typing, I thought would reduce the error made




> Are you looking for someone to transcribe your instructions or someone who will solve issues
> as they come up and generate appropriate notices?

* I currently have the computer operators & their task is to login and type the appropriate commands
* & generate appropriate notices/report.  Assume the skillset is not the factor (as the staffs are already
* hired), would the added typing skill / training help in their task to improve quality and productivity?
* Guess they won't get to go for Unix training as it's rather costly while typing training can be done
*  inhouse
sjm_eeCommented:
FWIW based on 25+ years at a command line ...

Q1 disagree

Q2 disagree

Typing skills are largely irrelevant to getting command line interactions correct.

Scenario a is about list-management not typing.
Scenario b is about knowing the command syntax not typing.
Scenario c is about mices (as in "i hate those mices to pieces")
Scenario d is about knowing how to type what you need to type. not type arbitrary text. I am a very bad typist but after 25+ years with a command line interface I can grep a yacc by the inode faster than you can say GUI.
arnoldCommented:
sjm_ee, I would have thought you would grep a bison which is a better yacc and has bigger inodes.
beetosCommented:
I believe typing skills will help in both scenarios.

Q1 - when typing is second nature, you're actually thinking the characters in your head, and muscle memory is directing your fingers to the right keys.  You now have two checks: 1 you know in your head if you've spelled something incorrectly almost before the words or symbols appear on the screen.  2. You're watching the output of your typing in real time, and can see if you've made a mistake even if you didn't catch it in the first mental check.   If you do know how to type, try this simple test.  Type something without looking at the keyboard OR the screen.  You'll find yourself catching and correcting errors without even seeing them!  

Q2 - Agree.  Maybe not so much drain/strain, but you are doing double work: Step 1 - look at the keyboard to find what you want to type.  Step 2 look at the screen to see if you actually typed what you wanted.  Whereas if you don't need to look at the keyboard, your watching what you're doing in real time.

Ultimately, being able to type (not just words, but the symbols, etc). is no guarantee that you won't make mistakes, but it definitely helps you work.  

I'm attesting to the usefulness of typing skills after having been in the industry at the command line for 15 years.  Yes, it helps!  And it's not difficult to learn.  Take 10 minutes a day and you'll be typing without looking in no time.  
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Outlook

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.