SCSI 80-pin SCSI Hard Drive - to - IDE or SATA interface.

Hi, I want to know where I can find (or make) an adapter or converter to plug into an SCA 80pin SCSI Hard Drive and then plug the other side of the converter into an IDE or SATA cable on the PC motherboard in order to read the drive.

***There's alot of adapters available that do the reverse of this, i.e., SATA/IDE Drive to SCSI interface - not what I want. So please read carefully before replying.

I realize plugging into a PCI or other slot SCSI adapter will allow me to read the drive too, but that's not what I want either. I need the connection described above.

Thanks!
Oyster55Asked:
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yankees9920Commented:
Looks like the same question was answered here.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Storage/Misc/Q_22024223.html
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DavidPresidentCommented:
such a beast is unlikely to exist.  From an engineering perspective, this would be a huge job, and I can't imagine any company making this investment for such a nice product, when one will take such a performance/feature hit to do this.  Forget power & interface/protocol conversion ... the SCSI target command set is much more robust then the SATA/ATA command-set, and many SCSI commands do not have an ATA equivalent.   So even if such a product existed, it certainly can't support the entire ANSI-required SCSI command-set.

A native SCSI controller is the only solution that won't just block some vital SCSI commands.
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nobusCommented:
i suppose you'll need a scsi controller card : http://www.nextag.com/80-pin-scsi-controller/compare-html
and so cionnect the disk to your pC
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Oyster55Author Commented:
dlethe: This is for data recovery device, so price / performance is not a concern.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
For data recovery?  Forget it then.  When one performs data recovery (been writing diagnostic software for such things for 20 years, so I speak from experience) , you need the most basic of SCSI CDBs, REQUEST SENSE.  There is no equivalent ATA command.  Without the ability to read ASC/ASCQ information your software will not be able to work.  ONly exception is if you have the source code, and are willing to encapsulate the commands using  the API for the bridge, and then you have to find a bridge chip that will even support target mode.  I do not think one is out there.

Give up, or purchase a laptop that enables you to install a SCSI controller, or  docking station with PCI support.  
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