Recommendation on which MS SQL to run with Vcenter

I was wondering what are the pros and cons for choosing SQL server for vCenter. I am not sure which SQL to go with either SQL 2008 64 bit or 32 bit or SQL server 2005 32 or 64 bit if there even is one. vCetner 2.5 update 6 should be the version of vcenter and the hosts will be esxi host

           Thanks Rob
boogieman01Asked:
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vmwarun - ArunConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Take a look @ this table for a detailed comparision
http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2005/en/us/compare-features.aspx 
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Paul SolovyovskySenior IT AdvisorCommented:
For vCenter 2.5 I would stay with SQL 2005 x32  or x64.  If you have only a few ESX/ESXi hosts you can install it as SQL 2005 Express instance.
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coolsport00Commented:
Virtual Center (for v.2.5; it's vCenter for v.4 vSphere) has virtually no limitations on what can be virtualized. I assume your actual question is whether you should virtualize your SQL server? And, if so, which version to run? VMware supports any of the versions you selected above (2K8 or 2K5 32bit and 64bit), so it's really up to you and what your org's needs/requirements are.

Regards,
~coolsport00
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boogieman01Author Commented:
we have a few different projects one will have 9 esxi hosts with 10 to 12 VMs that will be a largest deployment the other ones will have a just a few esxi hosts. We will use SQL 2005 express on some of the smallers ones what are your reasons for going with SQL 2005 32 or 64 over 2008?
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vmwarun - ArunCommented:
Adding to what paulsolov has updated, SQL 2005 Express Edition can support upto 5 Hosts and 50 Virtual Machines.
If you have any plans of upgrading your infrastructure then I suggest that you stick with either SQL Server 2005 x86 or x64.
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boogieman01Author Commented:
is it recommended to virtualize SQL server or have it physical
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coolsport00Commented:
Performance-wise, there are no differences; there are no limitations of doing so, so it really depends on if your org wants to move to virtualization (if it hasn't already) or not.

~coolsport00
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boogieman01Author Commented:
I guess with 64 bit you can address more memory if you have a 32 bit sql server is there a big difference in perfomance. I would think there would be more pro and cons it seems like it does not matter which one you go with 2008 or 2005
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coolsport00Commented:
You are correct; 2K8 provides more features, one of which is data compression. Here are a couple MS articles explaining more on new features:

http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2008/en/us/whats-new.aspx
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2008.04.overview.aspx

~coolsport00
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Paul SolovyovskySenior IT AdvisorCommented:
I keep the SQL physical, if esx hosts go down and the VM with it you then have to manage each esx host individually, find out where the sql server is, bring it up, make sure it connects to vcenter...

If it's physical and your vcenter is virtual you can install vcenter on any server and connect to sql db in under 25 min.
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VMwareGuyCommented:
The SQL doesn't need to be on a physical box, but if your environment is large then it would be better off if it was on a remote physical server.  As for your choice of DB, others have done well at pointing out the options.  However, Keeping SQL on a VM does offer you HA clustering benefits, are you clustering your physical environment??  also, if you go the virtual route, take a look at the parition align white paper about properly aligning your virtual disks, and also consider using RDM in virtual compatibility mode for the DB partition, this is what I do.  RDM in virtual compatiblility mode allows raw disk performance without limitations to the features of VMware clustering, like vmotion and HA.  
esx3-partition-align.pdf
vmfs-rdm-perf.pdf
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vmwarun - ArunCommented:
As long as you regularly backup your vCenter DB, you do not need to worry.
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boogieman01Author Commented:
awfewf
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boogieman01Author Commented:
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