special character

What is the name of the character that is following the numbers. It is neither a 0 or a O.

thanks
char.bmp
LVL 6
anushahannaAsked:
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Bill PrewCommented:
It sounds like you are getting a "special character" of some sort in the export file (tab, carrauge return, line feed, other...).  From the BMP you posted it can't be determined what that is.  If you can post a sample of the file here we could look at it.  Or you could get a hex viewer for the file and identify what character code that funny character is.

http://mh-nexus.de/en/hxd/
http://www.hhdsoftware.com/Products/home/hex-editor-free.html

Also, where does this character occur in the export file, is it only one of them at the end of a line, or do they exist at the end of certain fields?  If at the end of a line, there may be an option in your export tool that is causing this.  If at the end of one or more fields, take a look at the data in that field in the database, it could be that the character is present there.

In addition, code pages and character sets come into play when exporting from a database to a "flat file", if you are changing code page then it may be converting a displayable character in the database to a "funny character" in the flat file since there is no representation of the actual character.

The more info you can share the better chance we have of guiding you to a solution.

~bp
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deroodeSystems AdministratorCommented:
That is very dependent on the font, codepage and encoding. In standard ASCII the colon (:) follows the numbers

http://ascii-table.com/

In unicode it would be (based on the 4035 number) a TIBETAN CANTILLATION SIGN SBUB -CHAL (if Decimal) or maybe chinese

http://www.alanwood.net/unicode/tibetan.html
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deroodeSystems AdministratorCommented:
B.T.W. where do you use or find this character?
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Free Tool: ZipGrep

ZipGrep is a utility that can list and search zip (.war, .ear, .jar, etc) archives for text patterns, without the need to extract the archive's contents.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way to say thank you for being a part of the community.

 
anushahannaAuthor Commented:
I get this when getting info from database into excel.
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anushahannaAuthor Commented:
its not supposed to be there. (only numbers are allowed)- so wondering why this spooky character is in..
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deroodeSystems AdministratorCommented:
What database are you trying to access, and by what means? Do you have an export of the database?
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PC-MasterCommented:

probably is the tab char, that you can see if you take the excel file and open it in notepad, for instance.
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anushahannaAuthor Commented:
it is from SQL Server to Access. yes, it is an extract. please see attached in excel.
specChar.xls
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anushahannaAuthor Commented:
it is happening to only one column, and that too, only some rows. In the database, they all look the same, and are integers.
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Bill PrewCommented:
Looks like you are getting a x'0B' at the end, which is a vertical tab, odd to see that show up.  How are you exporting the data from SQL Server?  Is the field value in SQL Server actually the number part, without the special character?

00000000: 35 32 35 37 37 35 34 31 - 33 35 0b 0d 0a 0d 0a 0a   52577541 35......

~bp
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Bill PrewCommented:
Also, what is the datatype from the table definition for that field in SQL Server?

~bp
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anushahannaAuthor Commented:
bp, the datatype is bigint. yes, it is supposed to hold only real number. (no decimals)
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Bill PrewCommented:
Interesting.  I wouldn't think it would be possible to "stuff" a funny charater into a bigint field, that should only hold a number.

Is there any pattern to how these show up in the exported file?  Like are they on a group of consecutive records, or are they always seperated by some number of good records, etc?  

What tool or process are you using to create the export file?

As a test you might try doing an export without this field, and see if the funny charaters go away, or if they show up in some other field.  That might give us a clue if this is a data or formatting problem of that one field, or something the general export process is introducing that just happened to fall in that field.

Sorry this isn't more helpful / specific, just trying to think of things that might help you track down the issue.

~bp
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anushahannaAuthor Commented:
bp, it is a mystery. will watch out for it.

how did you figure out it is the vertical tab?
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Bill PrewCommented:
==> anushahanna:

==> how did you figure out it is the vertical tab?

I used a small hex display utilitiy I have to show the actual hev values for the character you were seeing.  The display from this tool was posted above and looked like:

0ffset         hex values                                                                  character data
------------   ------------------------------------------------------------   -------------------
00000000: 35 32 35 37 37 35 34 31 - 33 35 0b 0d 0a 0d 0a 0a   52577541 35......

Notice the 35 0b 0d 0a sequence.  The 35 represents the character 5, and the 0d 0a is a carriage return line feed pair, the normal end of line for a text file.  So we can see the funny character you are getting has a hex value of hex 0b.  Looking in the ascii table from someplace like below, we can determine that that is a special control character that typically represents a vertical tab.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII

Hope this explanation makes some sense, a bit hard to describe sometimes, let me know further questions.

~bp
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anushahannaAuthor Commented:
Thanks bp for that education.

do you recommend the HxD or the Hex Editor Neo/
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Bill PrewCommented:
While Neo looks a bit more robust and powerful, it also might bring more to the party than you need for simple stuff.  Based on that I'd suggest you start with HxD and see how it works for you, I think the simpler interface and approach might be the right choice.

~bp
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anushahannaAuthor Commented:
thanks a lot for your guidance, bp.
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