SharePoint Records Management and Documents Management ISO Standards

Does SharePoint 2010 meet these standards?

•      ISO 15489 - International Records Management Standard, and
•      ISO 19005-1 - Document management - Electronic document file format for long-term Preservation Standard
KarthickSethuAsked:
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Ted BouskillSenior Software DeveloperCommented:
As far as I know ISO 19005-1 was defined for PDF files which you can use in Sharepoint.

ISO 15489 is about defining a system and process for managing documents that isn't specific to any technology.  You can use File Cabinets OR Sharepoint.  So asking if Sharepoint meets those standards is like asking if a file cabinet does.

ISO guidelines for document management rarely are attached to specific technology.  If your business is capable of working within those guidelines yes Sharepoint will work great.
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KarthickSethuAuthor Commented:
Hi Ted, I understand what you are saying, but if you look at this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HP_TRIM_Records_Management_System and search for ISO 15489, it says, HP Trim was built in accordance with this standard. Why do they specifically say this and I am not finding such a confirmation about SharePoint in the internet. Can you help me with this? This is a new prospect am working on and they are really particular that I show some evidence for whichever solutoin I propose and I want to propose only SharePoint (2010)
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Ted BouskillSenior Software DeveloperCommented:
Well for one you can't trust WikiPedia completely and vendors will say anything they can get away with if they can sell their software.

I think you are better off reading the ISO specification for the standard and ensuring you understand it thoroughly.  That will mean far more to the prospect.  If a contractor came to me and said he had software that met a standard but he didn't understand the standard how could I trust him?
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SMcPCommented:
I agree with tedBilly, the first thing I did was actually searched for HP TRIM and found their documentation.  The Wiki page is an exact copy of the information found on their datasheet.  So if you are suspect of companies data sheets (which you should always be) then you should also be suspect of Wiki (which I am by default).
Now as to why HP would say this in their own documentaion, that is quite easy really, they read the specification and designed their system to meet its requirements.  However if you are really picky on the language what they are really saying is that they developed the product and kept all the records of their development in accordance with the standard.  Developing an application is not this standard, it is something else, ISO 90003-2004 see http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail?csnumber=35867
regarding SharePoint, well with a good enough programmer you can get it to do anything.  :) It can even jump through hoops if necessary. :)
Personally I would buy the standard, or a book relating to the standard (usually cheaper), and learn it.  Then determine the development costs vs the "off the shelf" version and create a clear business case of both proposals.  Do not, under any circumstances make the clients mind up for them.  A very bad idea, especially if you are wrong.  Let them take the blame - they made the decision.
Of course the other thing you have to consider is all the other operational aspects of the service, backups, restores, disaster recovery, business continuity (yes it is different) etc.  The other aspects of the service to consider also are the correct governance model...SharePoint is difficult in this area because it can do everything.  A good book on this can be found at ISACA see http://www.isaca.org/Template.cfm?Section=Bookstore&Template=/Ecommerce/ProductDisplay.cfm&Productid=1048
One thing I've always found, never shy away from buying your own books...they will always be there for you.
 
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