subnetting

Can you have 500 hosts on one subnet?and what class would you put this into ?
rooboAsked:
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LazarusCommented:
You will need a Class B: Look here for a good chart to show you: http://www.weird.com/~woods/classb.html
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LazarusCommented:
If you dont see it easily, instead of 255.255.255.0, you will use: 255.255.254.0 instead.
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luc_roySystem AdminCommented:
use this link
http://www.subnet-calculator.com/

it will let you pick the class b enter the ip you want and tell you what to make the mask.
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giltjrCommented:
If you MUST put everything in a single I would use a classless subnet and go with lazarus98 suggestion of 255.255.254.0 (/23) or possibly 255.255.252.0 (/22, which gives you 1022 hosts) as the mask.

This will give you a total of 510 possible hosts.  However, if you were to go with with a /23 and then add 11 more computers, you now have a problem.  More hosts than will fit into a /23.

However, is there any reason you need to have all of them in the same subnet?  Using multiple /24 (a.k.a class C) and a router would allow for expansion of your network.

You don't want too many hosts in a single subnet, so going with a /23, /22 (1000+ hosts), or even a /21 (2000+ hosts) you could start having problems with broadcast storms.
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rooboAuthor Commented:
Well what i need is a network with 3 subnets and each subnet  has 500 hosts per subnet.
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LazarusCommented:
Use 255.255.254 then if you only need the 500 per subnet. You can use 172.16.0.1 - 172.16.255.254 for everything you need then.
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rooboAuthor Commented:
Could you show me how useing the binairy conversion way.this would be a slash 23 am i correct.?
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Mechanic_KharkovCommented:
>>Could you show me how useing the binairy conversion way.this would be a  slash 23 am i correct.?

Yes. Slash 23 is mask with 23 bits length. Just convert 255.255.254.0 to binary form:
11111111 11111111 11111110 00000000, and count "1"'s. There are 23 "1"'s.
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rooboAuthor Commented:
And by working from left to right and the fact i will be using 500 hosts per subnet i will have 2 to the power of 9.which i subtract 9 from 32 to give me /23.how would i figure out my network id range and broadcast range for  the 3 subnets for the network.?
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giltjrCommented:
lazarus98's provided you with the correct answer(s) first, and one of his two answers should be accepcted.

If you want a class full subnet, then a B (/16  also 255.255.0.0) is correct. If you want the smallest subnet that will support 500 hosts, then a classless subnet of /23 (255.255.254.0) is the correct answer.

Not to downplay Mechanic_Kh… contribution, but all he did was give you the binary value of the mask that lazarus98 told you to use.



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Mechanic_KharkovCommented:
Agree with giltjr about points assigning. Correct answers are given above. And my post just explain how to count length of network mask.

>how would i figure out my network id range and broadcast range for  the 3  subnets for the network.?

If You decide to use mask /23 then You can number your subnets with any even address like
192.168.XX.00 where XX is even value. So last bit (lsb) of XX is not in network address but is a part of host address within subnet.
So, valid 3 subnets could have addresses like:
192.168.2.0/23
192.168.4.0/23
192.168.6.0/23

For first subnet available host addresses are 192.168.2.1 - 192.168.3.254. Broadcast address for this subnet would be 192.168.3.255 (9 last bits are "1"'s).

If You decide to use class B networks You'd calc network addresses according to 16 bit mask. E.g. 10.0.0.1 - 10.0.255.254 for first subnet and so on.
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rooboAuthor Commented:
Is an network ID range of 192 .168.2.0/23only erelavent to a class c network.?and is a 16 bitmask contiually going up gy 8 or 16 each time ?
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giltjrCommented:
Please see:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Protocols/Q_26049051.htm

Roobo, just as a F.Y.I., you are only supposed to post a question once.

I think you need to read about subneting and IP addresses.

     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subnetwork
     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_address
     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classful_network
     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classless_Inter-Domain_Routing

--> and is a 16 bitmask contiually going up gy 8 or 16 each time ?

What do you mean by this?  8 or 16 what?
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LazarusCommented:
I agree as well, but then I have a vested intrest.. LOL But as a rule, yes, the first most complete answer is normally the one that gets it, but perhaps he really needed the Binary... An Assist would have been ok as well. :)
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