Solaris System information

Hello,

I am just trying to find out some information on a Solaris SPARC system namely

- Processor Model Number
- Processing Speed
- Size of on-chip cache
- Bus Speed

What would be command/s be to get this information (the file-system is UFS)?
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MichaelT_Asked:
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RowleyCommented:
this value is referring to the speed of the cpu. Could you perhaps be referring to bus speed? If I remember rightly, Older systems used to display the bus speed for the device in question.  A seemingly digestible explanation of bus speeds, clock speeds and multipliers can be found here.


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halby29Commented:
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MichaelT_Author Commented:
OK thanks, I get some information from this, just to double check though

/usr/sbin/psrinfo -v
Status of processor 1 as of: 12/12/02 09:25:50
  Processor has been on-line since 11/17/02 21:10:09.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 400 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.
Status of processor 3 as of: 12/12/02 09:25:50
  Processor has been on-line since 11/17/02 21:10:11.
  The sparcv9 processor operates at 400 MHz,
        and has a sparcv9 floating point processor.

The 400 MHz is the processor speed correct?

I also used prtdiag -v | more and this gives me the first two, however I am having trouble getting the Size of on-chip cache and the Bus (System Clock) Speed

The first few lines that I get from prtdiag -v | more are:

System Configuration:  Sun Microsystems  sun4v T5140
Memory size: 32544 Megabytes

================================ Virtual CPUs ================================
CPU ID Frequency Implementation         Status
------ --------- ---------------------- -------
0      1582 MHz  SUNW,UltraSPARC-T2+    on-line

It seems as though System Clock Speed is no longer included in prtdiag -v information (older examples show it)?
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RowleyCommented:
What makes you think that 400Mhz is incorrect for that host? Sparc chips do not run at x86/64 speeds, they are different architecture.

Use prtpicl to find detailed info about your host. For example, for cpu:

prtpicl -v -c cpu

Will give you verbose information regarding the cpu's class installed in your server. Search for prtpicl in your favourite search engine for more details.
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MichaelT_Author Commented:
Rowley,

Sorry the 400MHz was from an example that halbey29 gave so I was just checking if that value was the processor speed or bus speed (clock frequency)

For example
System Configuration:  Sun Microsystems  sun4v T5140
Memory size: 32544 Megabytes

================================ Virtual CPUs ================================
CPU ID Frequency Implementation         Status
------ --------- ---------------------- -------
0      1582 MHz  SUNW,UltraSPARC-T2+    on-line

I assume 1582 MHz is the processor speed, am I right in assuming this? Just want to make sure I understand the output correctly.

prtpicl -v -c cpu gave me a clock frequency of 0x5e452cd8, so what does this translate to?

Thanks again for the help, it is appreciated :)
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RowleyCommented:
You assumption regarding the processor speed is correct.

To convert that hex value into decimal type "0x5e452cd8 into decimal" in google or, if you are using a MS operating system use scientific mode  "calc", paste the value in as a hex number (click "hex" first) then click "dec" to convert.

0x5e452cd8 converted to decimal gives us 1 581 591 768 hertz or 1.581 591 768 gigahertz
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MichaelT_Author Commented:
Great thanks Rowley - very helpful.  If the clock frequency is 1.582 GHz, then it looks to be the same as the processor speed? Is this possible? Or in this instance is the clock frequency "Processor Speed"?  Or am I off track again?

Sorry if the questions are basic, just a little confused :)

Thanks again,

Michael.
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MichaelT_Author Commented:
That's correct, now I am after the bus speed too, although I haven't found any commands that can provide it so it looks as though I might have to try and find out what the multiplier is and work backwards :)

Thanks again for your help.

Michael.
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MichaelT_Author Commented:
Thank-you again for the help.
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