RRAS (Windows Server 2003)

Hi,

I get my broadband through BT, and recently changed from a single static IP, to a range of (5) IP's.  The intention is to be able to create a records with my domain host to connect to different web servers:

server1.domain.com      =    81.118.100.125
server2.domain.com      =    81.118.100.126
server3.domain.com      =    81.118.100.127

Whilst I COULD plug all servers into the BT router, and have each server with the appropriate external IP address, I don't WANT to do this.

What I would like to do, I'm not sure is possible.

BT uses a dynamic peer IP system (the router gets a dynamic IP, which gets associated on the fly with my 'gateway' static IP).

I want the BT router (192.168.0.1) to send ALL IP traffic through to a multihomed Windows Server 2003 box running Routing and Remote Access (192.168.0.254 / 192.168.1.1) and for RRAS to worry about where to send the requests from there.

Is this possible?

I tried to add my address range to the address pool on the RRAS interface (192.168.0.254 which connects to the router) and then add an entry in the Service and Ports tab.  This wasn't successful.

Network Setup:

BT Router 192.168.0.1
                           |
                192.168.0.254
     Windows Server 2003 Gateway (RRAS)
                192.168.1.254
                           |
                      SWITCH
----------------------------------------------------------------------
            |
PDC Windows Server 2003 (192.168.1.1)
Web Server 1, Windows Server 2003 (192.168.1.2)
Web Server 2, Windows Server 2003 (192.168.1.3)
Web Server 3, Windows Server 2003 (192.168.1.4)
Clients (192.168.1.*)


LVL 3
SiJPAsked:
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Davis McCarnOwnerCommented:
Without the BT's specifics, this is kinda tricky; but most will let you remap port forwarding so....
In the router port forward 81.118.100.125:80 (port #) to 192.168.0.254:81, 81.118.100.126:80 to 82, and so forth.
In RRAS, create route from port 81 to server1, 82 to server2, etc and remap back to port 80.
If you don't remap the ports on the way to RRAS, it won't know which server to send it to.
Is that what you wanted?
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SiJPAuthor Commented:
Hi Davis - I think the problem here is the BT router, rather than the configuration I have.

What I wished to achieve from my post is the knowledge that my idea was workable.

BT router forward (indiscriminately) all traffic to my RRAS server, and for the RRAS to worry about where it sends traffic after that. Not being a network type person I didn't know if that was even possible!

I think it is.

I found a DMZPlus mode on the BT router, which I'm going to test out ..
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SiJPAuthor Commented:
Yeah this worked.

Putting into into DMZPlus mode allowed all traffic through to RRAS - my setup from there works a treat to.

Davis - You basically reconfirmed what I thought (which is all I needed) so thanks for that!

Mr BT router ... well, you get 0 points ;)
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Windows Server 2003

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