Windows CMS Dreamweaver

I have several web sites on a dedicated windows server. I would like to allow the owners of these websites the ability to update the pages and change images etc.

I expect I will need a security system to allow owners access to their files on the server.
 
I wondered if I could use Dreamweaver Contribute for the updating but I believe each customer needs to purchase a copy of Contribute. Several users have decided it is too difficult for them.

Is there a server side CMS for windows or perhaps it will need a dynamic method via a database?

Any other ideas please?
Thank you
John
johnhardyAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
ultrawebsitesCommented:
Hi John.

Looks like you're in luck: http://www.fasthosts.co.uk/dedicatedservers/windows-platform-installer/

The Web Platform Installer (WPI) is one of Microsoft's new tools as part of 'embracing opensource', and helps you to easily install a variety of platforms/tools on Windows. As you can see in the FastHosts link, the WPI includes WordPress icon, so it looks like your host supports that and that you can install it too. Here's a link for WPI http://www.microsoft.com/web/downloads/platform.aspx

As for WAMP on your local PC: well I have used the WPI to install WordPress and other dependencies (PHP, I already had MySQL installed) on to my local PC, which runs PHP through an IIS extension and not Apache. If you're going to be hosting a WordPress site on Windows (ie. using IIS, as the WPI sets you up to do), you may as well also develop on the same setup. So perhaps just use WPI to install WordPress et al as required, and then you don't need Apache or thus a port for Apache. On that note though, if I did have both IIS and Apache on a PC at a time as I have done in the past, I personally choose to only run one webserver at a time so I don't have to deal with different ports as I find that a bit of a hindrance at times.

HTH
Matt
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PoseidaonCommented:
Hi
Solution 1 : You may use ftp service so you can configure the rights of your customers which folder they may connect  so they can connect their allowed directory and make the changes

Solution 2 : You may write your own cms via asp.Web sites may have admin panel so your customers may change their images & files etc.

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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
Thanks
Solution 2 : "You may write your own cms via asp"
Can you please give me more information how this could be carried out?
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PoseidaonCommented:
Sure
in example you have a website and you want your customers to change some text and photos without asking you.

Just create a login page for your customer and using aspjpeg or aspupload component you may let your customer to change upload files to their websites.For changing text you may WYSIWYG editor.
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Jason C. LevineNo oneCommented:
Hi John,

The big flaw with Dreamweaver/Contribute (aside from the cost) is that it relies on static, separate pages for everything as opposed to a true CMS solution where the content is stored in a database and pulled out based on clicks and queries.  The former solution means you are constantly responsible for updating dozens or hundreds or thousands of pages whenever a design change is needed while the latter means you are responsible for no more than a handful of templates and everything else is rendered dynamically.

There really is no need to write a custom CMS.  So many are already out there and available for free (less for Windows but they are still there).  What I suggest is that you investigate moving your sites into something common and easy such as WordPress or DotNetNuke or similiar.  From your side, you would need to convert the sites over to the new framework (mainly installing it, configuring, then copy-pasting content) and set up the clients with permissions to edit via the browser.

If you don't want to go that route, you might want to look into Adobe Business Catalyst.  It provides CMS-like functionality (among other things) and integrates loosely with DW CS4 and promises much tighter integration with CS5.   It's far from free, though.

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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the answers.
Regarding WordPress or DotNetNuke are these OK to run on a windows server?
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PoseidaonCommented:
Wordpress based on php mysql  
if you install phpmyadmin you can run wordpress also joomla ( another cms ) is same
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Jason C. LevineNo oneCommented:
WordPress is mainly aimed at the LAMP environment but you can get it to work in a WAMP configuration if you follow the tutorials out there. DNN is designed for .NET and thus Windows.

There are others.  Google for "windows alternative to X" with X being WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, etc to get the list.
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ultrawebsitesCommented:
You can use WordPress on Windows, if your webhost has your server setup to serve PHP files, and if they have MySQL installed on it too. I use GoDaddy Windows hosting and it supports WordPress. Alternatively, another one to try on Windows is Umbraco http://umbraco.org/

HTH
Matt
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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the information.
I wonder if I should get one of my spare windows machines converted to the LAMP environment to avoid possible conflicts between windows and linux.
IE running applications meant for linux on a windows machine.

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ultrawebsitesCommented:
Microsoft has recently changed their tack a bit, and claim to be 'embracing' open source (which as an aside, is an interesting reflection on where I.T. is at). MySQL and PHP were originally meant for Linux, but they've been ported to Windows for quite a while now, for someone big like GoDaddy to start supporting is a good sign of confidence.
But I know what your saying :-)
I was a sceptic initially but have changed my mind lately. Best of both worlds in some ways.
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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for that information Matt.
I am using a dedicated windows server at fasthosts. Do you think I would I be able to continue with that server and could I develop on my local windows PC. Maybe I start with WAMP as suggested by Jason?
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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
If I use WAMP where IIS is already using port 80 would I need to designate a new port such as 8080 or whatever?
Thanks
John
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letharionCommented:
>would I need to designate a new port such as 8080
Yes, you would need a new port, you can't run two servers listening on the same port. 8080 is a good choice.
>Do you think I would I be able to continue with that server and could I develop on my local windows PC
That should be very doable. I would recommend getting used to svn for easy transfer from dev -> production environment.
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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
Thanks letharion
getting used to svn
Can you say what is svn please?
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Jason C. LevineNo oneCommented:
SVN is short for Subversion which is a version control schema/system.  By usign DW (especially CS4 or later) you are already familiar with the concepts (local version/testing server/live server) and moving files from one place to the next.

More info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apache_Subversion
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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
May I say a very big thank you to everyone for such excellent answers. I have certainly learned a great deal and I hope this thread may be useful to others.
I will now be able to decide which way is the best way forward from this point for me.

If its agreeable I will split the points.
Regards
John
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letharionCommented:
I'm just glad to help.
Split the points as you please :)
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Jason C. LevineNo oneCommented:
Works for me.  

This was a good thread to participate in.  Someone should turn it into an article :)
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ultrawebsitesCommented:
As an aside, of course the acronym is not so appealing when you combine Windows with open source: WIMP...! (with IIS). Oh well, that's what I'm running I guess...! :-D
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johnhardyAuthor Commented:
Very helpful and informative answers.
My thanks to all.
John
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