Not enough free space on 2003 Server drive to defrag.

I've been trying to use the online LiveCare 'defragger' but only get an error message that the program needs 15% free space on the drive and there is only 7% free space. When we first got our server, for some reason, the tech who set it up decided to make c:\ drive very small (12gb) and put only a few basics there while making another partition d:\ drive (220gb)hold most of the programs and data. Therefore there is very little on C:\ but most of it is essential to the system so I can't just delete files to make room for the defrag to work. Any ideas on how I can get this drive defragged? Can a third-party defragger handle this situation?
BobArnettAsked:
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netcmhCommented:
I'd recommend first cleaning it to the max, and then still if it's not enough, use a partition manager to expand that drive
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jakethecatukCommented:
Check the disk for *.dmp. *.tmp files.

Also check for hyberfil.sys - this is a hybernation file.

You can also move your pagefile.sys drive to the D: - this should free up more than enough to allow defrag to take palce.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
The tech who installed it was probably going with the Dell default.

And 12 GB is MORE THAN ENOUGH SPACE - if you know how to manage it appropriately.

My servers (running 2000 and 2003) typically have between 10 and 20 GB have 25% or more free space.  

I suggest you read this link for a list of 20+ things you can do to manage the server appropriately and free up space:
http://www.lwcomputing.com/tips/static/bootdrivesize.asp
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rvivek_2002Commented:
Hi Chek where is the Page file located. If that is set on C: drive you can chage it to the other drive, through
My computer, right click , properties , Advanced, Perofrmance. Change the seetting to place the virtual memory file on the other disk
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bahigeCommented:
Right click on the C drive and go into its properties from My Computer.  Then go to the Shadow Copy tab.  You can probably turn shadow copy off and gain about 1-2GB (if it's not already off).

I agree with netcmh in that you can use partition software to expand the disk.  I also agree with jakethecatuk in that you can move your pagefile over to the D drive.

I would also look for any other applications installed on the C drive.  Sometimes apps can be moved from Program Files or WSUS could also be installed on C.  Moving the WSUS repository can save a ton of space.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Cleaning up the C: drive is virtually risk free.  RESIZING has a NON-ZERO chance at causing the entire system to become corrupt.  Which makes more sense?
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BobArnettAuthor Commented:
Ok. I've been working at cleaning up the drive but so far could only free up one more MB. I do find a whole lot of folders in the Windows folder with names like "\\whitson01\c$\WINDOWS\$NtUninstallKB925454". Some are quite large (17.3  MB) and they go back several years. Can they be deleted?
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BobArnettAuthor Commented:
More info on that: There are 4482 files in 428 folders and are taking up about 600 MB.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Is there a reason you haven't read my link?  I specific address those folders in the link... along with about 20 other things.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Quoting from the link:
Remove Old NTUninstall Folders
When a Windows Update is applied, Windows creates a backup of the files and registry entries that were changed so that, if necessary, the update can be removed. These backups are stored in folders within the %windir% folder, typically labeled $NtUninstall... - ending in a number which corresponds to the KB article related to the update. For example, the folder C:\Windows\$NTUnInstallKB936357$ is the original files that were replaced when the patch described in Microsoft KB Article 936357 was applied. In general, I like to keep 9-12 months of these files handy. There have been occasions where I needed to replace a corrupt/incompatible file and having a relatively recent version of it on the disk has made things easier. That said, TECHNICALLY, you don't need to keep any of them unless you intend/expect to have to remove them. If you really want to be safe, burn these folders to a CD or DVD before deleting.

A couple of notes - these old files are typically compressed so they may not recover quite as much space as you are hoping for. Also, as noted in the more information link below, Do NOT delete the $hf_mig$ folder!

For more information, please read What are the $NTUninstall folders? Can they be deleted?
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BobArnettAuthor Commented:
I AM in the process of reading your link. It is, however, 17 pages long and I do have a job besides this. :) I will jump to that area of the report and read that first. Thanks for the tip.
Ok, I moved most of those $nt folders off the drive but that only brought me up to 1.45GB of free space and I am told I need 1.8GB (15% of 12GB).
So, now I am interested in "Moving the WSUS repository can save a ton of space" but I can find no evidence of a folder "C:\Program Files\Update Services\Tools" in order to run wsusutil.
I also have found that Symantec installed its programs (Backup Exec System Recovery, Endpoint Protection and Backup Exed 11d for Windows Server) on to our server's C: drive. As usual, Symantec is a pain that way. I don't remember specifically on these installations but Symantec can be pretty insistant on where things go. Because Symantec's products are usually difficult (for me anyway) software programs to deal with, I'm reluctant to try and move them. I'll do a search and see if there is some easy way to move the programs to a different location.
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bahigeCommented:
I would search your hard drive(s) for wsusutil.  Can you grab it from another wsus server?  What is in the tools folder?
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BobArnettAuthor Commented:
Did the search (again) and did not find "wsusutil". I did find quite a few files with the name "wsus3setup" but different extensions (cab, cat, inf). There were duplicates of most of these in different folders. We only have one server.
I couldn't find a "Tools" folder but did find two folders named "Administrative Tools" (in different paths) which were empty, a folder named "System Tools" which only had a link in it to Internet Explorer, a folder named "Configuration Tools" in a Microsoft Server SQL folder which contained three files with "SQL" in the names and a folder named "Admin Tools" which is part of our accounting software.
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jakethecatukCommented:
bobarnett - leew has written a very comprehensive guide on how to free up space.  I suggested very early on moving your pagefile.sys (swap file) to your D: drive as this would give you the space you need to do what you want.  Why are you ignoring both pieces of advice?
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BobArnettAuthor Commented:
Give me a break. I am not ignoring anyone's advice.
I'm sorry I neglected to mention earlier that I checked the pagefile.sys and found that it is already on drive D.
I've already responded to some of leew's guide and am still working my way through all the suggestions. It just takes me a while. I'm still trying to learn how to move the WSUS files (see my last comment.) Even though I've been using ExpertsExchange since 1997, I am (as I reported in this posting) a beginner in this area. Please be a little patient with me. I appreciate all the time and energy you experts put into this. Thank you, I have benefited greatly.
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BobArnettAuthor Commented:
It took a long time to finally get down to the one entry that worked for my situation. That was disabling 'shadow copy' on the drive and then, after running defrag, enabling it. bahige narrowed the answer down and if I had read his answer first, it would have saved me quite a bit of time. leew's all-inclusive guide was almost too thorough and although it also had the "shadow copy" solution, for my purposes it was more of a shotgun approach. Thanks to both of you.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Your perceived time savings is like choosing to drive your car without insurance - saves you money... unless you get into an accident.  If you haven't re-enabled it and re-located it you are shooting yourself in the foot if you need to recover files on the C: drive.  Further, if you don't do more of the things on my list, you're going to end up having the same problem repeatedly.  

It seems to me, if you had looked at the summary table - mentioned in the first paragraph on the page (http://www.lwcomputing.com/tips/static/bootdrivesize.asp#summary), and the recommendations, you could have narrowed this down quite quickly if you weren't interested in doing things properly for the long term.

Frankly, you asked "Any ideas on how I can get this drive defragged?"  I answered COMPREHENSIVELY (and was apparently punished for it) by providing you a long list of things you can - with recommendations on whether or not it was a good idea.
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BobArnettAuthor Commented:
I am really sorry if I have offended anyone here. I've never had this happen on EE before and I evidently may not have handled this very well. I do apologize.
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Windows Server 2003

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