Moving for Physical server to Virtual server using VMware

We are planning to virtualize our servers and some of the servers are database servers and some are application server.
What are the things I need to consider? Memory and CPU shouldn't me much problem. We may have issues in I/O performance. If I calculate  current IOPS of each server and if I add together I will get total IOPS for the all the physical server and If we buy EMC storage and  if we can IOPS equal to sum of physical server's IOPS, then we are ok right?
Anything else  we need to consider?
mokkanAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
IanThCommented:
yes calculation of iops is probably the most important when considering virtualization

memory and cpu cores is easier

Gig networking is a absolute must if not faster
0
 
IanThCommented:
I mean make sure yout virtual server has enough cores and memory as all of your physical servers
0
 
IanThCommented:
with a little memory overhead for esx
0
Ultimate Tool Kit for Technology Solution Provider

Broken down into practical pointers and step-by-step instructions, the IT Service Excellence Tool Kit delivers expert advice for technology solution providers. Get your free copy now.

 
coolsport00Commented:
Pretty much any type of server is ok for virtualization. There are really no stipulations or hinderances. You configure identical resources in the virtual world as you do physical. I would slightly over allocate RAM on VMs that have higher I/O, but other than that, no true caveats exist. You can use P2V tools such as vCenter Converter Standalone (or the Converter plug-in within vCenter) or Vizioncore's vConverter, but whenever possible I recommend creating VMs from scratch.

Regards,
~coolsport00
0
 
Vijay kumar MohanrajCloud ArchitechCommented:
it is very simple, first you need to add server to "Guided consolidate" on VC server and wait for a week it will analysis and provide the confidential level status based on that you can able to virtualize this server.

Please let me know if you required any help on this.
0
 
mokkanAuthor Commented:
We are buying almost 15 of 600 GB FC 15K Disks and we are planning to put in RAID5 configuration. Can we do 5 Disks in each RAID group and make 3 RAID groups or better to have 10 Disks with one Raid group and other one with 5 disks with one Raid group? Which would give better performance?
0
 
IanThCommented:
I would use a raid span 10, 50 or 60 as these add a level of protection thats missing in 5
as you can survive mulliple hdd's dying
0
 
coolsport00Commented:
Actually, you really shouldn't be asking mutiple questions within a single post, but I will answer for you. For best performance, you can configure RAID10, which requires a minimum of 4 disks, the problem there is you lose 2 disks. I guess the best answer is dependent on your org needs. What VMware techology do you plan on using...ESX or ESXi? If ESXi, the hypervisor install is only 32MB in size, so I would get a couple small disks, mirror them, and install the OS on it. Then, add other disks for your storage (datastore)...maybe 3 RAID10s of 5 disks each.

Regards,
~coolsport00
0
 
andyalderCommented:
If total IOPS for the VMware shared storage is same as total of your current IOPS you should be OK so long as you have enough RAM so you don't get excessive paging. You may get slightly different performance, for example if your current databases have had their stripe sizes tuned you can hardly do that in a mixed workload environment, I don't think you can even change it on a Clariion. Alignment matters, VMware aligns automatically but Windows pre 2008 doesn't so you could get better performance than before if you create Windows and Linux templates that are aligned to start with, good article on that here - http://www.vmdamentals.com/?p=328
0
 
mokkanAuthor Commented:
Thank you all of you. Coolsport I will open a new thread about this.
0
 
coolsport00Commented:
Awesome; sorry...just EE "rules" is all :)

~coolsport00
0
 
Vijay kumar MohanrajCloud ArchitechCommented:
Hi is that my information was usefull ?
0
 
andyalderCommented:
I wouldn't have thought so since guided consolidation tells you nothing about disk IOPS.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.