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ping - request timed out

My setting is pretty easy. A brand new router - A brand new switch - a pc
when I ping the router, it timed out several time. what is wrong? ping
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Commented:
Is a wireless connection or ethernet ? if ethernet check the wire
Try using the same cord and plug directly to the router. That will rule out the switch at least. If you are still having problems try a new cord. Even try a different computer if you can't narrow it down from there. That should pinpoint the location of the error. Then you can go from there.

Author

Commented:
it's a wired connection. I have tried to plug to router and same result.

Author

Commented:
and the network cable is brand new
what about other pcs?
ones that didn't get hit by lightning say

Commented:
try with another wire, just in case
Top Expert 2010

Commented:
The problem is that you do not know what devices were affected by the strike; They do not have to show signs that they were affected. Try and install a NIC into the system and try again; if you say that the router, switch and cable are new, the only variable left in the equation is the PC.

Billy

Author

Commented:
I will try that for sure. My question is if really the nic is the problem and all other devices are good, in this case, the request timed out message doesn't sounds right to me..... in my understanding, when received  the request timed out message usually is the destination device not responding in a designated time.

Top Expert 2010

Commented:
ahhhh; no, "request timed out" means that it never received an ICMP echo-reply from the ICMP echo-request/ The application is reporting the request-timed out not the router.

PC: -----> echo request -------> Router

PC<----- is expecting a echo reply------<Router

What you have to understand is the application (Layer 7) builds the data (ICMP echo-request and sets the timeout timer [1second]) and sends it down the lower layers where headers and trailers are added to the PDU, finally reaching layer 1 (Where possibly the NIC is bad, [For whatever reason, one reason might be that the NIC is not even converting the frame to bits because that chips/asic that handle the logic got damaged by lightening]). Note, that nothing is sent back to the application that the data was not able to be converted to bits, the application merely outputs an error the the user (Request Timeout) as it did not receive the expected Echo Reply (ICMP echo-reply).

Hope this helps

Billy

Author

Commented:
>"request timed out" means that it never received an ICMP echo-reply from the ICMP echo-request

It sounds it's the same as I said, no? pc send a ICMP request to router and router didn't reply, so the application on pc reporting - times out. Am I saying it wrong?

In my case, the NIC on pc is defective, so ICMP data cannot be converted to bit before sending to router, so in this case, I ALSO receive - timed out. Is this you were trying to say?
Commented:
You are saying it right, effectively the PC says it never got a response. However, we do not know if the router got the ICMP request, and if it sent a response (which never arrived at the PC).

Also, it is in theory possible that the router processor is too busy to have time to answer ICMP requests. I little more info about the router and switch may be useful.

Try several ports on the router - if you have more available on it - to rule out a problem with the specific router port.

If you have another cable to try with, that would be good too.

You can also try to set the port speed to 100 duplex, instead of relying on auto-negotiation which sometimes cause problems.

If you want to check the NIC on the PC, connect it to something else and try to ping. For example, another router or directly to another PC with a cross cable (use 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 as IP addresses on the PCs; do not use DHCP).

Author

Commented:
I have found out the problem finally. It's one of the pc is causing the ping timed out problem. Here is how I tested:

I have 5 (A, B, C, D, E) pcs and 1 server connected to the brand new switch and from the switch there is a network cable to the brand new router. I disconnected everything and put back server to switch and one laptop. At this time, from either the server or pc, there is no timed out when ping to the router. Next, I connect back station one by one and doing ping test. So when I connect back the D station back to network, ping from any stations times out!!! I replaced the network card and now everything is fine.

My question is why a bad network card can cause this kind of issue? Because I was NOT pinging from the bad NIC, I was actually pining from other pcs with good NIC to the router.
The computer with the bad NIC card was tying up your router and not allowing to respond to the PCs you were pinging it with.

Author

Commented:
Thanx bfritz0409. And do you know is there a better way to find out which pc is causing the network problem? For a small network it's easy to test one by one, but if i have more than 50 pcs, it's will be crazy.
A good packet sniffer utility or network monitor package might help you detect issues in your network. I can recommend http://www.paessler.com/prtg. There are many other utilities out there that might suit you better. Also depending on your router there may be some utilities included in the firmware to troubleshoot network issues such as this. Hope this helps.

Author

Commented:
Thank you so much bfritz0409! do you think wireshark can do it? which item should i look into there?
I have started using PRTG few days ago, but not familiar. Which sensor do I need to setup and what will it show when there is a problem like this?

Commented:
Most likely the bad NIC was sending broadcast packets continuously, flooding the network.

If you would start Wireshark on any other PC you would have seen those packets all over the Wireshark display.

If you are into Linux you could also install ntop on a Linux PC on the LAN. That will give you statistics over time, IPs and protocols.