Setting up SCO OpenServer 5.0.7 with Samba 2.2.6 to host a share for Windows 2003 Server

mclarksonaz
mclarksonaz used Ask the Experts™
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I am attempting to set up my SCO OpenServer 5.0.7 to share one of its folders with a Windows Server as a mapped drive via Samba. I have done this in Linux but usually it was the linux system pulling from the Windows system and my Samba was a newer version. 2.2.6 was the last SCO release of Samba supported by OpenServer 5.0.7. I have gotten to the point where my Windows systems can see the SCO box in Network Places but it is unable to connect, returning the error, "The account is not authorized to log in from this station." I have disabled the encryption, changed the group policy to send unencrypted passwords to 3rd party SMB, set NTLM levels to minimum, and even enabled encryption in smb.conf. I am tearing my hair out here. Does anyone have access to a setup guide for connecting such an old version of SCO to server 2003 via samba? Any help would be great. Thanks in advance.
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I have one account with the same OS configuration (SCO 5.0.7 and Win2003), but we use Visionfs 3.1 instead of Samba.  I don't recall doing anything unusual in setting it up.
If you are open to changing from Samba to Visionfs, I can send you a copy.

Author

Commented:
I am more than happy to try. As long as the result is being able to map folders on the SCO box to the 2003 server I am sure the boss doesn't care how I pull it off.
Don't use VisionFS.  It's a complete hunk of junk.

For testing purposes change the smb.conf file to use open sharing instead of user authorised.  Find the security line in the conf line and make it:

   security = share

Then set up a share like this:

[public]
   comment = Public Stuff
   path = /u/public
   public = yes
   writable = yes
   printable = no

Make sure the unix permissions are wide open on /u/public and run a test.

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Author

Commented:
Ok, almost there. Now just have to work out smb user creation. Have never worked that out on SCO. Linux setup for this is cake. How do I link a Windows user to a SCO user?
Samba 2.2.6 is rather old and the newer style of encrypted passwords may not be functional but you could try one of the methods in section 2.5.X here:

http://osr507doc.sco.com/en/samba_help/Samba-HOWTO-Collection.html#AEN365

I have something sticking in the back of my head that tells me that you need to set the windows client to support plain text passwords (they are encrypted, just in an acient style) in order for this old version of samba to work with modern windows clients.

Author

Commented:
I did that in both the registry and the group policy. The problem is some usernames in the windows server are over 8 characters and SCO 5.0.7 yells at you when you try that. It says in some of the docs that you can use smbpasswd and smbuser to map Windows users over but it doesn't give you any idea how.
Commented:
you should be able to add samba users by running:
smbpasswd -a username

in the samba dir (/etc/samba on linux by default) there's a file smbusers, which allows you to map user x to user y.  check here:
http://www.labtestproject.com/samba_smbpasswd_file_and_samba_smbusers_configuration_file
I think it may not even be an option in 2.2.6 (circa 2002) being that XP (circa 2001) was brand new and NT 4.0/2000 were the nes MS OS's at the time...

You might have better luck with a newer samba (3.0.14) here:

ftp://ftp2.sco.com/pub/skunkware/osr5/vols/

Author

Commented:
By pairing the information from the two chosen solutions the share works correctly. Thank you to all.

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