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find sender ip in lotus notes

techlearner11
techlearner11 used Ask the Experts™
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Hi, how to find the sender information like sender machine ip or system ip and sender network ip or router ip in lotus notes?

i tried in yahoomail and gmail with the help of headers but i could get only network ip but not the senders machine ip. Is it possible to find senders machine ip? how to find the same in yahoo,gmail and ms outlook and ms outlook webaccess?

And how to get the headers in lotus notes and sender machine ip and network ip.

thanks,
techylearner

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Sjef BosmanGroupware Consultant

Commented:
In Notes, in a received mail, all there is available is in the source of the mail: View/Show/Source. The same you can see through the Document Properties, 2nd tab, the items with the name Received.

Author

Commented:
Hi sjef_bosman,thanks for your reply. from the source, can we find the system ip from which the mail was sent but not the internet server ip or router ip? i want to find out its it possible to find the sender machine ip. For example, if my machine ip is xxx.xxx.x.xx and the server ip which my system connects to,to access the internet is yyy.yyy.yy.yy, then is it possible to find xxx.xx.x.xx from the headers in view source?

Thanks,
techylearner
Sjef BosmanGroupware Consultant

Commented:
If it's not there then it's not there. That's why it's so hard to fight spam, mails are very difficult to trace back since intermediate nodes don't add a lot of trace information. It's all in the SMTP specifications, and you could call this a real flaw.

Sorry...

Author

Commented:
can anyone please shed some more light on the same.
thanks,
techylearner
Groupware Consultant
Commented:
http://ask-leo.com/can_gmail_be_traced.html

The mail client (Yahoo, Gmail, Notes, Outlook) doesn't matter, for they all use the SMTP protocol to send mail. Sender details aren't included in the protocol. What complicates matters further is that many senders don't have a fixed IP-address, which means that even if you'd have the IP-address the sender used, it could be used by someone else the next day.