How to ext3 read/write in Windows NTFS just as MacDrive reaching HFS+ partition and allows read/write.

jazzIIIlove
jazzIIIlove used Ask the Experts™
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Hi there;

Could anyone tell me how to reach ext3 partition and execute read/write in Windows NTFS just as MacDrive reaching HFS+ partition and allows read/write.

Any 3rd party software for this in Windows?

Best regards.
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This one appears to be great too http://www.diskinternals.com/linux-reader/ 
Hi!

Neither 'explore2fs' or 'linux-reader' can write to a ext2/3 file system.

You can use fs-driver to both read and write to a ext2/3 file system. Install it in Windows OS and it will assign a drive letter to the ext3 partition.

Ref: http://www.fs-driver.org/download.html
Ref: http://www.fs-driver.org/faq.html

Regards, Tobias
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FDomingos88:
Thank you FDomingos88.

TobiasHolm:
>>Neither 'explore2fs' or 'linux-reader' can write to a ext2/3 file system.
Thank you TobiasHolm.

Are you sure that I am going to install this?
Ext2 Installable File System 1.11a in your link:  http://www.fs-driver.org/download.html

It seems it works only for Ext2 (From the name, I guess so). Are you sure it will work on my ext3? My distro is Ubuntu 9.04. Any known issues?

Best regards.
I have XP and 7 boxes. My 7 is 64-bit. Are there any known issue with 64-bit 7 or 64-bit Vista?
Ext3 will work too:

"Does the Ext2 driver access Ext3 volumes, too?

The Ext3 file system is the Ext2 file system which has been extended by journaling. Ext3 is backward-compatible to Ext2 - an Ext3 volume can be mounted and used as an Ext2 volume. Just as older Linux Kernels which do not know the Ext3 file system can mount Ext3 volumes (as Ext2 volumes), the Ext2 file system driver ext2fs.sys for Windows incorporated in this software package can do it without any problems, too. Of course you do not take advantage of the journaling of the Ext3 file system if you mount it as an Ext2 file system."
It should work in XP/Vista/2008 (both x86 and x64 platform), but I'm not sure on Win7.
Does the program assign a letter for the drive in my Windows?
No joy, When I click, it lists that the program is working in all Windows except for Windows 7. Damn, when I see Vista there, I had thought it will be working in my 7 too.
ok, a workaround but still not working, I right-clicked the exe and I select "Troubleshoot Compatibility" and select Windows Vista SP2 and it's installed and I give a letter to linux partition but when I want to open the linux drive in "My Computer", it simply says it's unformatted. So, what should I do?

src: http://www.robertbeal.com/528/mount-ext3-in-windows-7-x64

Best regards.
Ok, in the given link, it gives a command for cmd:
mountvol R:\ \\?\Volume{792de021-9e3e-11de-80cf-001d094608bc}\
What is the {792de021-9e3e-11de-80cf-001d094608bc}? I mean it looks like some kind of UID for the drive? How can I find this string in my machine?

<quote>
The powershell script to make this work is the same as the command shown:

mountvol R:\ \\?\Volume{792de021-9e3e-11de-80cf-001d094608bc}\

Just put that in a .ps1 file and use start->accessories->system tools->task scheduler to create a new task to run the ps1 script at boot. Task scheduler is rather intuitive.

The only hang up is that by default powershell is set not to execute scripts unless they are digitally signed by some sort of authority. You can change this setting with the Set-ExecutionPolicy cmdlet as explained here:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee176949.aspx
<unquote>

Best regards.
and what is the risk of using the very above command?
mountvol R:\ \\?\Volume{792de021-9e3e-11de-80cf-001d094608bc}\
>and what is the risk of using the very above command?

Well, it's always a risk when running programs. Mountvol is a built in command in Windows so it shouldn't be a big risk.

>How can I find this string in my machine?

sudo blkid
1blkid.gif
so I guess I am going to write my linux partition's UUID. Right?

Best regards.
Have you succeeded installing the fs-driver on your Win7 box?

Have you checked your Control Panel for the "IFS Drives" item?


"How are drive letters configured for Ext2 volumes?

Creating, modifying and removing of drive letters is very simple. Please use the "IFS Drives" item, which has been installed on the system's control panel. "
ScreenIfsDrives.gif
Can drive letters also be configured from scripts?

With version 1.11 of the Ext2 IFS software, drive letters can be configured with the Windows mountvol utility (except on Windows NT 4.0). This is useful if you want to control them from a script.

The mountvol utility is used just as if the drive letters would correspond to native Windows volumes, regardless of whether the volumes are native Windows volumes or Ext2/Ext3 ones.

First create a drive letter, for example X:, for a given Ext2/Ext3 volume with the "IFS Drives" item in the control panel in order to conveniently identify it in the following steps:

Use the Windows mountvol utility in order to identify the persistent volume name of the volume (replace X: with the actual drive letter):
mountvol X:\ /L

Now mountvol will report the persistent volume name (example):
\\?\Volume{241c8cc6-c4e4-11db-8168-c5932447ec37}

The persistent volume name of a native volume of Windows remains valid unless Windows is reinstalled again. The persistent volume name of a volume that is managed by Ext2 IFS remains valid as long as the Ext2 IFS software remains installed.

You can use a known persistent volume name for a specific volume in order to create a new drive letter:
mountvol X:\ \\?\Volume{241c8cc6-c4e4-11db-8168-c5932447ec37}

You can delete a drive letter with
mountvol X:\ /D
>>Have you succeeded installing the fs-driver on your Win7 box?
with Vista SP2 compatibility, it doesn't let me with Windows 7 as says in the link. Note that as in the link, I install it, I give a name to Linux partition say Q: but when I click on it, it says "let's format". So, I got afraid and remove the program.

>>First create a drive letter, for example X:, for a given Ext2/Ext3 volume with the "IFS Drives" item in >>the control panel in order to conveniently identify it in the following steps:
>>Use the Windows mountvol utility in order to identify the persistent volume name of the volume >>(replace X: with the actual drive letter):
>>mountvol X:\ /L
Without creating a letter to that partition, does this mountvol command apply?
To be able to use the mountvol command, you first have to install the fs-driver. After that, reboot the computer.

If you get a question from Windows saying "do you want to format", just press no. This is because Windows doesn't recognize the ext3 partition. If you press "no" Windows won't format the partition. Did you reboot the computer after installing the fs-driver the first time?

And as always, be sure to have a backup of your data before experimenting with the partitions. ;)
:)
Sure, I will have my backup prior probing this.

In that thread, it seems the guy is worried about messing of partitions with that program and he "invents" using that command.

So, is there absolutely no way for this process?:)

Best regards.
Seems like someone succeeded according to this: http://www.robertbeal.com/528/mount-ext3-in-windows-7-x64

" adic_tech  says:
29 March, 2010 at 8:22 pm

YES ! Its working without annoing UAC confirmation!
- enable Administrator account (net user administrator /active:yes )
- set Administrator password (net user administrator *)
- create a task in Task Scheduler to run as Admin at strartup the moutvol command
Succes!
adic"


But maybe you can use a NTFS partition instead and access it from Linux that way? Of course it depends on what you want to do and how many hard drives you have and such. Just an idea...

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