Theoretical question: What if I forget my BIOS password of my SONY VAIO. Is there some super password approach?

jazzIIIlove
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Hi there;

This is a theoretical question: What if I forget my BIOS password of my SONY VAIO. Is there some super password approach for SONY? or should I apply remove CMOS and put it back after 10 mins or so?

and I have always paranoia that even I don't forget it, my password won't unlock BIOS screen. Can this happen? If so, what could be the scenario?

Best regards.
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Quid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
Commented:
It depends.

On what model Sony it is ...

Go read http://www.geek.com/forums/topic/sony-vaio-bios-password-forgotten

There is a post - No 14 - by Ray Bay half way down the page that goes into all of the details for Sony VAIOs.

Commented:
I believe you can also get this from SONY by calling them. may cost 10$.
Commented:
You could get in the BIOS for older version by some set of passwords or by removing the battery to the CMOS for some time as you mention.

However, this is not possible with the newer set of machines. The password is stored in a different chip and
cannot be reset. Its a designed is such a manner for security reasons. So that if a machine is lost, some one could claim full rights on the machine.

The only way you could reset such a machine is to call the relevant company with proof of owner ship before you could get it reset. You will probably have to pay company some money as suggest above by snurker.
I reckon the company has the record of the reset BIOS password for the machine in question.

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Hi there;

dbrunton:
my model is SONY VAIO FW4ZTJH
>>About one third of Sony VAIO's can have the password removed by removing the CMOS battery, the >>laptop power battery, the hard drive, and the power cord, then letting it sit for 60 hours
All the steps above including removing CMOS battery? or "just" removing battery and power cord and waiting for 60 hours will purge the password?

OK, for the resetting softwares, is it reliable of using them? Could you provide me any link, that one failed with such a software?

For retrieving softwares, is there any risk of using them? Do they cause some kind of crash for the machines?

snurker:
>>I believe you can also get this from SONY by calling them. may cost 10$.
Please provide a link next time, any link for this 10$? How can they know my BIOS password? or are you refering for superpasswords?

Best regards.
asidu:
>>However, this is not possible with the newer set of machines. The password is stored in a different >>chip and cannot be reset. Its a designed is such a manner for security reasons.
Does my SONY VAIO FW4ZTJH include at new set of machines. Could you provide me a link?
and moreover, is there any example of someone that sets the password and inputs the password for it and BIOS won't let him/her in?
dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
Commented:
>> All the steps above including removing CMOS battery? or "just" removing battery and power cord and waiting for 60 hours will purge the password?

You need to remove the CMOS battery as well.  No guarantee that this method will work.  Note the link I supplied earlier talks about storing the password in an EEPROM chip.  If this method doesn't work then it is quite likely the password is there.

>> OK, for the resetting softwares, is it reliable of using them? Could you provide me any link, that one failed with such a software?

It is a method.  It may or may not work.  See here http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/showthread.php?t=23980 for attempts using password recovery software.  It didn't work.  Note how old the date is.  If it didnt' work then I doubt if it would work now.

Password recovery for laptops is usually done by the Sony agents who would have the right tools if they exist for removing the password.  They will usually require proof of ownership.  This is done by all the laptop agents to discourage theft of laptops.


>>EEPROM
Yep, I have seen that:) but let me ask this: if I remove the CMOS battery, is the risk high to lost the machine?

>> to discourage theft of laptops.
My personal thought is that what is the point of this when there is a e.g. Recovery console for a Windows.

Best regards.
>>moreover, is there any example of someone that sets the password and inputs the password for it >>and BIOS won't let him/her in?
dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.
Commented:
>> and moreover, is there any example of someone that sets the password and inputs the password for it and BIOS won't let him/her in?

There aren't any examples of that.

Because it can't be shown or proved that this actually occurred.  Lots of examples of people forgetting passwords and BIOS not letting them in.

You can Google

BIOS forgot password

for examples of that.
I mean there is a false implementation of a BIOS in the machines of my former employment place. We set password to all machines but in those machines, some specific brand-I won't be giving the brand here- when I typed some characters very fast and press <enter> immediately after, it lets me in. I know the password and what I typed and definitely not the password. The machines were 3 years old. So, after that incident, I stop trusting BIOS passwords but still have the idea of using them which is my contradiction:)

Regards.
dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.

Commented:
>> if I remove the CMOS battery, is the risk high to lost the machine?

Unlikely but a remote possible.  What should happen is that the CMOS chip in the machine loses all power and thus everything stored in it disappears.  On startup again it should go to default settings and thus no password.

However if password is in EEPROM you still can't get into laptop.

>> My personal thought is that what is the point of this when there is a e.g. Recovery console for a Windows.

There may be a number of passwords on a laptop.  BIOS (and there may be two types here).  Hard disk.  Windows.

If the hard disk is password protected you aren't getting into that.  That password isn't removable by even the laptop agents.  And taking the disk to another machine won't work.  The data isn't readable.  Windows passwords can be bypassed to get the data on them if the hard disk is accessible.

So you've got two main forms of security for laptops, the BIOS and the hard disk (which is the important one).


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