why is the sun yellow

The obvious follow on from my last question is why is the sun yellow? Or at least why does it look yellow when i look at it?

I presume the sun is emitting lots of radiation. Does it radiation in the visible range or is the raditation it emits of a higher frequency and gets redshifted (i think that means the wavelength gets longer) as it travels to earth? If it does emit light in the visible range then why does it appear yellow and not white

thanks
andiejeAsked:
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Rodney BarnhardtServer AdministratorCommented:
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Rodney BarnhardtServer AdministratorCommented:
Here is an additional explaination:
http://www.universetoday.com/42268/why-is-the-sun-yellow/ 
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ozoCommented:
>  Does it radiation in the visible range
yes
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunlight#Composition
> gets redshifted
Very slightly because of the gravity of the sun, but not enough to be noticeable without very precise measurements
> why does it appear yellow
blue light is scattered by the atmosphere, leaving the transmitted light more yellowish
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aburrCommented:
" If it does emit light in the visible range then why does it appear yellow and not white"
for exactly the same reason that you have been told the the sky is blue.
You look at the sun through the air. The air remove some (but not all of the blue) What do you get when you remove some blue from white. Answer - yellow.
when the sun is about to set the light goes through more air, removing more blue, making the yellow redder.
All this including the red shift part is contained in ozo's answer
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andiejeAuthor Commented:
Jolly good
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