• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 2964
  • Last Modified:

Comparison between UVNC and Teamviewer

I have been asked by the company I work for to do a comparison between UVNC and Teamviewer to support our remote users.

The enviroment is:
* All users machines are running XP pro.
* Sometimes both myself and the user needing support will be at remote sites and connected via a broadband link to the internet. So we will not be in a static office enviromen that has servers, routers etc under my control.
* Some of the users I support are very, very computer illiterate. Talking them telephonically through a problem is tortuous. They cannot be depended upon to initiate or accept any remote assistance invites or accepting any remote support incoming connections, that require more than a few normal mouse clicks (asking them to do a  right mouse click is a challenge).
* There will be very little file data copied during the remote support sessions, it will just doing a few mouse clicks on their pc, so it will not need lots of bandwidth.

I have started trying out Teamviewer (free version) and it seems to work quite well.
Now somebody has told them about UVNC, and they want a comparison.
From what I have read about UVNC it seems a whole lot more complicated to set up and there will probably be more for the user to do, to accept a incoming connection.

So I need to know what would be the best choice in light of the above criteria.
Please give a few reasons.
Also if you could let me know does either need any minimum bandwidth requirements (in view of us connection via broadband).

Thanks Guys, any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
Cheers

0
MichaelK2
Asked:
MichaelK2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
2 Solutions
 
samithsukumarCommented:
check out  the below Link,
http://forum.ultravnc.info/viewtopic.php?p=45255
 
 
0
 
rindiCommented:
The problem with all versions of VNC is that you can't simply connect to the PC needing help without having to change settings in your firewalls and routers. You need to forward or open ports, and if there are multiple users at one site who may require VNC installed, you either have to have every PC use a different port for VNC, or setup one PC which is always available for VNC access, and then use remote Desktop or something similar to connect to the other PC's in the LAN from that connection. So teamviewer or logmein are far easier to setup and use for your clients, as all that is needed is to start the app, maybe confirm the firewall popup to allow access. You don't have to go through changing settings on the router....
0
 
MichaelK2Author Commented:
Ok, it gives me a few useful points but I am looking for some definite reasons. Preferable from somebody who has used both products.
0
Get your problem seen by more experts

Be seen. Boost your question’s priority for more expert views and faster solutions

 
rindiCommented:
I think those were definite reasons not to use VNC where things need to be simple for the users which I pointed out above. The only reason not to use teamviewer or logmein would be if your clients can't pay it's price, as the free versions are only for home users (Teamviewer is also free for schools). Logmein is loaded at startup, so the user doesn't have to do anything, and teamviewer can also be installed so it loads at startup, but I have never used it that way and am not sure if the use then still has to give you his Teamviewer ID and PIN.
0
 
MichaelK2Author Commented:
Thanks once again guys.
0
 
B HCommented:
by the way with uvnc you can create your own custom EXE file... and then publish it to your users, copy it to their desktops.  the EXE file is about 200kb depending on the size of your company logo you want to use.

you tell the user "double click [that file] then double click [the tech name who is helping]

after they do that, it pops up on the tech's screen to accept the incoming connection and you then have their screen.

if the remote person has a static ip or not, it doesnt matter, and NO ports need to be forwarded in their firewall.

it would help if the tech had a static ip address, but you can use dyndns.com to get around that if you have to.
the tech side has to have one port forwarded in the firwall, but you get to pick the port when making the exe file

0
 
B HCommented:
... with that, there's nothing to install on the remote side, they just litterally have to double-click the file, and double-click a pre-set tech name (which is the destination they want).  you can keep it hosted on your company website, we use a link like http://www.company.com/remote.exe but we also dropped the EXE file on all the desktops out there anyway.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Get expert help—faster!

Need expert help—fast? Use the Help Bell for personalized assistance getting answers to your important questions.

  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now