Wifi roaming

Hi everyone,

i'm  trying to put wifi roaming on my company but i have some questions :

To put the roaming, i must have the same :

WPA key

But i read in some post that you must have differenet channels. Wich is true ?

I bought 2 Cisco Small Business WAP2000 (Fast roaming)
Here is there configuration :

modem /router :

IP :  (3 on router 2)
Submask :
gateway :
DNS : isp dns

SSID2 : none
SSID3 : none
SSID4 : none

Wireless Network Mode : mixed
Wireless Channel : 6
Security Mode: WPA2-personnal mixed
Wireless Isolation (within SSID):disabled
Wireless Isolation (between SSID): disabled
Shared Secret: the same

the rest by defaut.
The configuration is the same on the two routers. (exept for the ip)

Is my configuration correct ?

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Jimmy Larsson, CISSP, CEHConnect With a Mentor Network and Security consultantCommented:
That is not true. Because the 802.11b-channels are overlapping you only have 3 non-interfering channels available. Best practice is to use channel 1, 6 and 11. If you use channel 1, 2 and 3 in the same are they will interfere with eachother.

But the answer to the question is correct: You should choose different channels for adjacent access points. For roaming there is no requirement that says that the ap:s should use the same channel.

In a small environment you can set the channel to auto as recommended above. Upon reboot each ap will analyze the rf environment and choose the best channel available.

But in order to achieve roaming you need to have the same SSID and security/encryption-settings on all AP:s.

"But i read in some post that you must have differenet channels. Wich is true ?"
You should try to have a wireless channel that's unique to your router in your area... the US regulations allow 11 wireless channels, so if you have 5 wireless networks in your area, you have at least 6 that are unique... if you can set it to auto, that would be ideal; the computer will connect to the router regardless of the channel, it just needs the SSID and passkey (WEP/WPA etc)

Your configuration appears to be correct otherwise.
TchouguiAuthor Commented:
And what about the Wireless Network Mode ? Should i keep it to B-only, G-only or mixed is fine ?
When i putted my channel to auto, it was on channel 10 do you think i should live it that way ?
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Jimmy Larsson, CISSP, CEHNetwork and Security consultantCommented:
Mixed mode is fine, it means that both b and g are supported standards which is fine in most implementations.

Mixed is fine for connecting to the intenernet. B might be a bottleneck for some ridiculously high speed connections, but G may break compatibility with some legacy devices.
truromeo4julietConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I would leave the channel on 10 if it's selecting that by default. Without using 3rd party program or client manager, windows doesn't have a way to show you what channel other networks are using, so leave it at 10.
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