wiping ultra320 scsi drives

I have a relativey large stack of 80-pin ultra320 scsi drives I have pulled from some of our older HP proliant DL380 servers and I am trying to devise a way to wipe the data off them before I attempt to get rid of them.

Anyway, I've always invisioned being able to do this like I always have with other old drives, which basically has been to get a USB connected cradle type device that would just mount the drive as external storage and allow me to wipe the drives with a drive wiping software package. The problem is that I haven't had alot of luck finding a single drive cradle like this and was wondering if anybody mught have some alternate ideas for me to get these drives wiped? Thanks
IRRexpertsAsked:
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DavidPresidentCommented:
Well, even if you could find a USB-attached protocol converter, it would be so slow that it would take a week to send out sufficient I/O to wipe a single drive.  
You'll need a JBOD SCSI controller, and hopefully you have one of the vanilla HP SCSI expansion chassis to attach it to.  I would use the SANtools smartmon-ux secure erase program.  It will work under windows, linux, solaris, whatever, and can do multiple disks at the same time.  Price around $100
 
☠ MASQ ☠Commented:
Wiping the drives securely so that data cannot be forensically recovered is going to be time-consuming.  If you are not intending to put them back into use have you considered physically destroying the platters?
It's a lot quicker (and can be quite therapeutic :))

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DavidPresidentCommented:
The SANtools software can easily do a multi-pass DoD compliant destruction of 100+ SCSI drives concurrently in a few days on the same system, if you have a way to hook them up.  If you just want to zero them, instead of doing anything that is compliant then it can do them all overnight.

(As for destroying the platters, in order to be compliant with anything at all, you can't have any piece of the media greater than a few millimeters in size,  which isn't the least therapeutic.  You'd have to degauss them or pretty much grind them up into something the size of BBs.  If you worked for the CIA, then the disks would have to be powdered :)
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Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software EngineerCommented:
It is doubtful that there is such a thing as a cradle for a U320 SCSI connector drive.  U320 SCSI cabling imposes strict restrictions on cable type and length, and there would still need to be a U320 PCI32 or PCI64 SCSI controller involved.

Agree with Masqueraid.  If you just want to dispose of the drives, take a Big Hammer®  to them.  A couple of hits smashing the platters makes complete data recovery impossible, and fractional recovery difficult except by a very determined 3-letter government agency.

If you are thinking of reselling them for a profit, check ebay prices on used drives of that type.  Used SCSI drives are generally cheap due to the limited audience and legacy application.  It may not be worth the time and effort to wipe them.

andyalderSaggar maker's framemakerCommented:
Adaptec USB Xchange is a USB to SCSI converter, however it isn't 80 pin so not much use to you. Several old Proliant models have non-RAID SCSI connection on the motherboard, e.g. some ML350s. Or you could use a DL380 with split (duplexed with a little jumper board that came with them) backplane and have two disks on the internal RAID and the other 4 on a non-RAID internal card.
IRRexpertsAuthor Commented:
I decided I am going to physically destroy the drives. It sure would be nice if there was some commercial device that was affordible and specifically designed for shredding these suckers to nothing!
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