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how do i grant a user permission to create folders

Posted on 2010-08-18
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
i need to grant a user higher level of filesystem permissions.  I want to give him root permissions.  i have the admin account.
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Question by:globalterminal
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7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:adallen
ID: 33465039
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Author Comment

by:globalterminal
ID: 33465083
got an example?
and sudo will be effective the change whenever the user logs in?
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Accepted Solution

by:
adallen earned 300 total points
ID: 33465121
Follow the man page:

man sudo

you will need to add the user to the sudousers file under /etc/ by using visudo

All the answers are in the man page

example:

user types:

sudo chmod 774 /home/user/bla

or you can give the user full root permissions:

sudo /bin/bash
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LVL 78

Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 33465208
Instead of user rights elevation that susdo provides, you might be better off using setfacl if there is a specific location where you want the user to have these rights.


setfacl is equivalent to chmod but allows the admin to configure multiple levels of access to the same folder.
i.e.
group1 has read-only access /resourcefolder
group2 has read-write access /resourcefolder
these can only be seen using getfacl /resourcefolder

setfacl -m g:group1:rx /resourcefolder
setfacl -m g:group2:rwx /resourcefolder

for user you would use u:username:rights

ls / | grep resourcefolder
will have a + at the end of drwxr-xr-x+ to indicate that there is an ACL.
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Author Comment

by:globalterminal
ID: 33465393
the user needs permissions to create subdirectories inside the the /opt dir.

how would i do that?
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Assisted Solution

by:jeremycrussell
jeremycrussell earned 200 total points
ID: 33465901
A few options.

1. Add the user to the owning group of /opt and change permission of /opt to allow it group writeable "chmod g+rwx /opt"

2. Just open /opt to be writable by the world (not recommended) "chmod ago+rwx /opt"

3. Create an acl to allow that single user access to write to /opt. "setfacl -m u:<user>:rwx /opt", replacing <user> with the proper uid.
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Author Comment

by:globalterminal
ID: 33465938
i used chmod 777 opt
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