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check partition size in esxi

Posted on 2010-08-19
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Last Modified: 2012-05-10
How do I check the partition sizes in ESXi 4. I have vMA running. I have vdp.pl script. I thought I might be able to do -h switch but that didnt work either. Also, the fdisk -l does not list the partition sizes ..please assit.
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Question by:VMwareLover
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by:coolsport00
ID: 33476621
You can check it, but it's slightly different in ESXi than ESX. There was an EE post on this a couple/few months back that I assisted with....let me find it and post back...

Regards,
~coolsport00
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by:coolsport00
ID: 33476819
Enable SSH if you haven't already (sounds like you have) and Putty into your ESXi host. Once logged in, type:

df -h

That should work for you.

~coolsport00
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by:coolsport00
ID: 33476843
This is the EE post back in June:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/VMWare/Q_26231328.html

~coolsport00
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bgoering earned 2000 total points
ID: 33476882
You can glean the imformation from fdisk -l

You will get output similar to
Disk /dev/disks/vmhba2:0:3:0: 429.4 GB, 429491220480 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 52216 cylinders, total 838850040 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes

                 Device Boot         Start       End    Blocks   Id  System
/dev/disks/vmhba2:0:3:1           128 838850039 419424956   ee  EFI GPT

in this case start - end + 1 gives blocks,  83885003 - 128 + 1 = 838849912 Units of 512 bytes
838849912 * 512 = 429491154944 bytes
divide by 1024 to get 419424956 KB
divide by 1024 to get 409595 MB
divide by 1024 to get 400 GB

Hope this helps


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by:VMwareLover
ID: 33477049
Something must be really wrong , cuz my partitions are tiny.. plz see below.. f I decipher the sizes using ur tehnique, my partitions are really small.. also what do these partitions really mean?

Coosport, I dont want to enable ssh on the hosts or use any unsupported feature..


vdf.PNG
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by:coolsport00
ID: 33477087
How are you viewing the info you screenshotted above? Did you try vCLI? The commands I provided will work with that, as well.

~coolsport00
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by:VMwareLover
ID: 33477231
I am using vMA. How do I use that in vCLI?
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by:coolsport00
ID: 33477281
Actually, I spoke (typed) too soon :)  Let me do some more checking...the cmds are different in vCLI. I'm not familiar with vMA.

~coolsport00
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by:bgoering
bgoering earned 2000 total points
ID: 33478112
Your partitions look normal for ESXi 4. It doesn't take much room for the OS - I have one of mine installed on a 1 GB USB Stick with plenty of room to spare. Your larger partitions will comprise your vmf datastores, and you can easily view the size of those through the vSphere client. Here are the relevant entries from a ESXi 4.1 system (USB) Drive using fdisk -l -u

Disk /dev/disks/mpx.vmhba32:C0:T0:L0: 1039 MB, 1039663104 bytes
64 heads, 32 sectors/track, 991 cylinders, total 2030592 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes

                           Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks  Id System
/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba32:C0:T0:L0p1          8192   1843199    917504    5  Extended
/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba32:C0:T0:L0p4   *        32      8191      4080    4  FAT16 <32M
/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba32:C0:T0:L0p5          8224    520191    255984    6  FAT16
/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba32:C0:T0:L0p6        520224   1032191    255984    6  FAT16
/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba32:C0:T0:L0p7       1032224   1257471    112624   fc  VMKcore
/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba32:C0:T0:L0p8       1257504   1843199    292848    6  FAT16

Good Luck

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by:bgoering
ID: 33478142
Note that if you installed to a hard disk (instead of a USB or flash drives) you will likely see a vmfs partition that will be large enough to take the rest of the drive.

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by:VMwareLover
ID: 33478684
OK but how can I run fdisk -l -u via vMA. When I run this on vMA it doesnt tell me the size. If you think thats normal, what happens when this gets filled up with logs. What do these partitions even mean?
Linux
Linux swap / Solaris ... I am guessing this is the swap
Linux
Extended
Linux

This is what I see on my fdisk -l.
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Expert Comment

by:bgoering
ID: 33479299
I am not sure if you can control the partition size ESXi creates like you can with ESX. Take a look at http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?cmd=displayKC&docType=kc&externalId=1007638&sliceId=2&docTypeID=DT_KB_1_1&dialogID=101514977&stateId=1 0 101522021 for how to check free space in each partition, and how to manage/delete files should a filesystem become full.

I have only ever even heard of a problem with log files as related to IPMI, and I don't use IPMI here so haven't run across it.

Good Luck

BTW http://www.boche.net/blog/index.php/2008/10/24/esx-partitioning-a-lost-art-form-in-esxi/ is an article from ESXi 3.5 has some discussion (but no resolution) for your concerns.
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by:VMwareLover
ID: 33479946
I simply ran df via vMA on the target host and that seems to be giving me what I was looking for. But I am still not sure if this is safe and wont blow up on me one day... Gosh cant belive you cant edit this ...
df.PNG
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by:bgoering
ID: 33480090
I worried about it a bit myself when first playing with ESXi, but like I mentioned earlier about the only problem I have even heard about with out of space had to do with IPMI, and I don't use that featuer. If you do use that feature you may want to explore further.

I would expect (but haven't seen it documented) that log rotation on ESXi would be fairly agressive. In ESX(i) platforms the vmkernel log seems to be the most active, but it doesn't ever get all that big.

Good Luck
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by:coolsport00
ID: 33480475
I would suspect that with the going away of ESX, this will (crossing my fingers, but certainly not holding my breath)...this will be *enhanced* with the next major release??? Will be at VMworld next weekend so will be asking a LOT of questions about future enhancements :)

~coolsport00
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by:bgoering
ID: 33480513
I plan at asking a few myself at VMworld :)
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by:coolsport00
ID: 33480657
Email me offline (see my EE profile) and let me know if you'd like to get together somewhere. I just missed out on the Sunday evening party, but may still try to go to get in (sorry for blogging on your post "VMwareLover").

~coolsport00
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